Cultural And Intellectual Life Thematic Essay On Belief

Presentation on theme: "Global 10 Thematic Essays"— Presentation transcript:

1 Global 10 Thematic Essays
TopicsPolitical SystemsHuman andPhysical GeographyBelief SystemsPowerChangeHuman RightsCitizenshipScarcityImperialismConflictScience andTechnologyInterdependenceCulture and Intellectual LifeJusticeUrbanizationDecision MakingMovement of Peopleand GoodsDiversityNationalismEconomic SystemsNation StatesEnvironment and SocietyNeeds and WantsFactors of Production

2 Thematic Essay Topics European Feudalism Mao Zedong French Revolution
HinduismSilk RoadRussian RevolutionIsraelBantu MigrationPrinting PressCrusadesMikhail GorbachevEnlightenmentNeolithic RevolutionAge of ExplorationFall of the Roman EmpireSeed DrillStalin’s RussiaProtestant ReformationRenaissanceWorld War IGolden Age of Democracy (Greece)Louis XIVQueen Elizabeth ITreaty of VersaillesRiver Valley CivilizationsIndustrial Revolution

3 European Feudalism and Manorialism
BACK TOfall of roman empireEuropean Feudalism and ManorialismAfter the fall of the Roman Empire,Western Europe would soon fall into afeudal period with lords and kingscontrolling pieces of land and fightingwith other lords for control. Feudalsocieties were tightly closed institutionswith the church carrying most of thepower. Peasants and serfs were thelowest on the social ladder, but theygenerally accepted their fate as the willof God. Although they varied in size,the manors were self-sufficient. Eachmanor had a manor house, a villagechurch which was the center of manoractivity, the peasants cottages, fieldsowned by the lords and fields owned bythe peasants, a mill, a common pasture,and a woodland. Of the lord’s fields,one would remain unplanted each year.This was known as the fallow field.EconomicDuring the Middle Ages, the manor system (manorialism) was the basic economic arrangement.1) Based on a set of rights and obligations between a lord and his serfs2) The lord provided the serf with housing, farmland, and protection frombanditsIMPACT3) In return, serfs tended the lord’s lands, cared for their animals andperformed other tasks to maintain the estate4) Peasants rarely traveled more than 25 miles from their own manor5) Manors were self sufficient, everything they needed was produced onthe manor (crops, milk, cheese, fuel, cloth, leather goods, and lumber)6) Peasants (serfs) paid taxes on grain and marriage, as well as atax which was 1/10th of their incomePoliticalThe feudal system governed Western European society.There was a strict social system in place where everyone had a role.1) The structure of the feudal society was like a pyramid with the king ontop nobles and bishops next, knights below them and peasants lastIMPACT2) People were classified into three groups: those who fought (knights),those who prayed (people of the church) and those who worked(peasants). You were born into a social class3) Serfs (peasants) could not lawfully leave the land. This wouldeventually lead to peasants leaving for the Crusades3) Serfs (peasants) could not lawfully leave the land.4) The feudal system was based on rights and obligations. In exchangefor military service a lord or landowner, granted land called a fief. Theperson receiving the fief was called a vassal. Knights pledged toprotect the vassal’s land and peasants worked the land.HOME

4 French Revolution Reign of Terror IMPACT Napoleon gains power IMPACT
BACK TOEnlightenmentFrench RevolutionThere was a great unrest in France,caused by bad harvests, high taxes, andunfair treatment of the Third EstateCause of the French Revolution:1) Enlightenment Ideas: Members ofthe Third Estate were inspired by theAmerican Revolution and enlightenedideas about equality, liberty, anddemocracy.2) Economic Troubles: The heavyburden of taxes on the Third Estatewas becoming too much to bear. Whilethe First Estate (aristocrats) paid none,and the Second Estate (clergy) paidlittle, the Third Estate had to pay all ofFrance’s taxes. When France got intotrouble economically due to thespending of King Louis XVI and MarieAntoinette as well as the cost ofsupporting the American Revolution,the Third Estate was forced to payeven more in taxes.3) A weak leader – Louis XVI: Louis didnothing to fix France’s economicproblems. Instead, he ignored hisadvisors and listened to bad advicefrom his wife. He ignored the moneyproblems until it was too late, and thenwhen he suggested the nobility paytaxes, he was turned away.Reign of TerrorAfter the Third Estate was victorious, theyset out to establish a society based on equality. Their Declaration ofthe Rights of Man was similar to the Declaration of Independence.It would not last as a terrorist group known as the Jacobins, and ledby Maximillien Robespierre, took power and a reign of terror soonbegan.1) The church’s land was taken away and sold. The church becamepart of the state. This turned many peasants against the rulers2) The former aristocracy was imprisoned or beheaded with theguillotine being the weapon of choice. As many as 40,000 wereexecuted, with 85% of them being peasants. The reign of terrorwent after anyone considered an enemy of the state3) King Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette were beheaded after therole of the monarchy was weakened and finally dissolved.4) After Robespierre’s execution, the French turned to a new leaderIMPACTNapoleon gains powerIMPACTHOME

5 Hyperlink to Josef Stalin
BACK TOWorld War IRussian RevolutionAs a result of a strict autocratic czaristrule, troops firing on protesting citizens(Bloody Sunday), the failures of Russiaduring the Russo-Japanese War, andWorld War I, the Russian people finallyhad had enough. Vladimir Lenin took atrain out of Germany where he was exiledand helped Russia overthrow theprovisional government that replacedCzar Nicholas’ rule. Lenin was able togain the support of the peasants byoffering them three things that theylacked…”Land, Peace, Bread”.After the provisional governmentreplaced the Czar, there was hope thatRussia would withdraw from World War I.When this didn’t happen, Russia wasripe for a civil war. Vladimir Lenin sawthis as his opportunity and he and hisBolsheviks overthrew thenew provisional government andreplaced it with a type of governmentbased on the writings of Freidrich Engelsand Karl Marx known as Communism.Communist GovernmentLenin’s first act as a Communist leader was to restore order in Russia. He initially put aside his plans for a state-controlled economy. Instead he installed a small-scale version of capitalism called the New Economic Plan (NEP).1) The NEP allowed peasants to sell their surplus crops instead ofturning them over to the government.2) Some aspects of Communism were evident however as the newgovernment did control major industries, banks, and communication.3) Small factories, businesses, and farms were allowed to operate underprivate ownership. Industry would soon reach pre WWI production4) The government also encouraged foreign investment5) Russia was changed to the USSR in 1922 and the Bolsheviksrenamed themselves the Communist Party. Lenin had established adictatorship of the Communist Party, not a dictatorship of theproletariat as Marx had promisedIMPACTRule of Josef StalinHyperlink to Josef StalinIMPACTHOME

6 Printing Press Age of Exploration IMPACT
Invented by Johann Gutenberg, theprinting press made it easier, cheaper,and faster to print books. With booksreadily available, people slowly began toread. The first book to be published wasthe Gutenberg Bible. Once this waspublished, no longer was reading andinterpreting the Bible restricted to churchofficials, priests, and monks. Nowordinary people were able to read andinterpret the Bible. Once they began tointerpret the Bible, they began toquestion the powerful church. Once theyquestioned the church, the churchbegan to lose power. The first toquestion the church was Martin Luther.His questioning of the church led to theProtestant Reformation.Another impact of the Gutenbergprinting press was the Age of Exploration.With people reading about far awayplaces, their imagination took over. Theyno longer were content with merelyreading, now they wanted to explore. Aquestioning and adventurous spirit arose.This would turn into the Age ofExploration. Sailors would head off tofar away unknown places to see whatwas really out there. The Age ofExploration would soon lead to Europeanimperialism in the Americas as well asglobal tradeAge of ExplorationIMPACThyperlink to Age of ExplorationReformationIMPACThyperlink to ReformationHOME

7 EnlightenmentThe period between 1300 and 1600 wasa time of great change in Europe. TheRenaissance, a rebirth of learning andthe arts, inspired a spirit of curiosity inmany fields. Scholars began to questionideas that had been accepted forhundreds of years. Meanwhile, thereligious movement known as theReformation prompted followers tochallenge accepted ways of thinkingabout God. While the Reformation wastaking place, another revolution inEuropean thought had begun, one thatwould permanently changed how peopleviewed the physical world. Astronomerssuch as Galileo began to question thechurch’s view of the world. A newscientific method took place, withscholars testing out ideas and drawingconclusions based on observation.Enlightenment ideas would soon spreadfrom views of science to views ongovernment. Thomas Hobbes, JohnLocke, Baron de Montesquieu, and JeanJacques Rousseau would soon presentideas that would change the face ofgovernment the world over.Scientific Method The basis for the Scientific Revolution was the Scientific Method.  The scientific method uses observation and experimentation to explain theories on the workings of the universe. This process removed blind adherence to tradition from science, and allowed scientists to logically find answers through the use of reason.  This method of research is the basis for modern science. Copernicus: Nicolaus Copernicus developed the heliocentric model of the universe.  This states that the sun is the center, and that the earth revolves around it.  Despite his calculations, many scholars disagree with his theories and continue to believe in the geocentric model proposed by the ancient Greek Ptolemy 1500 years earlier. Galileo: Galileo continues Copernicus' work by observing the skies with a homemade telescope.  Although he was able to prove Copernicus correct, his work was rejected by the Church and he was forced to recant (take back) or face execution.Newton: Isaac Newton built upon the earlier work of Copernicus and Galileo and used mathematics to describe gravity as the force that keeps planets revolving around the sun.  He also explained that this same force is what causes objects to fall to earth.Effects The Scientific Revolution had far reaching effects.  Besides changing the way people thought about the universe, the use of the Scientific Method resulted in discoveries in medicine, physics, and biology.  IMPACTThe American and French Revolution:The Enlightened thinkers such as Locke, Montesquieu, and Rousseauencouraged the Americans to challenge the British for independence.The belief that all men are created equal and that government should bemade by the people and for the people inspired the Americans into theRevolutionary War. After seeing the Americans success against theBritish, the French Third Estate were encouraged to overthrow therepressive French Monarchy.IMPACThyperlink to French RevolutionHOME

8 Age of Exploration European Imperialism in the Americas Italian IMPACT
BACK TOEuropeanRenaissanceBACK TOprintingpressAge of ExplorationBy the early 1400s, Europeans wereready to venture beyond their borders.The Renaissance encouraged, amongother things, a new spirit of adventureand curiosity. This spirit of adventure,along with several other importantreasons, prompted Europeans to explorethe world around them. The desire fornew wealth was the main reason forEuropean exploration. The Muslims hadcontrolled the Mediterranean trade routeand only allowed the Italians access totrade. A shorter trade route was neededto get to India and the rest of Asia fromEurope. Leaders of Spain and Portugalwanted to gain power through trade, andaccess to India was vital. Columbusconvinced Ferdinand and Isabella tosponsor a voyage westward to India.Instead of sailing to India, Columbusdiscovered a new land, the Americas.Changes would soon take place as theSpanish would colonize the Americas.European countries would soonbecome world powers and a neweconomic system known asmercantilism would result. Colonieswould be used to supply materials andmarkets to the mother country.European Imperialism in the Americas Italianexplorer Christopher Columbus convinces Spain to be the benefactor ofsailing to the west to reach the East Indies. Columbus ends up in theAmericas and Spain begins colonization (Gold, God, and Glory).Spanish Conquistadors soon begin their conquest of the Americas.Hernando Cortes conquers the Aztecs of Mexico in search of gold andsilver. Francisco Pizarro conquered the Incans in the Andes mountains.As Spain colonizes the Americas, the encomienda system is put inplace, guaranteeing Spain a source of labor. The native people of theAmericas were put in lower classes and mistreated while other slaves inthe Caribbean were even less fortunate and put into slavery. Diseasesand forced labor soon take their toll as Native populations dwindle toalmost nothing.Portugal also gets into the Americas by claiming Brazil.IMPACTGlobal Trade and Mercantilism After the nativeAmerican population was wiped out, the Spanish began exporting slavesfrom Africa to work the land. Some 9.6 million Africans were imported tothe Americas. England would soon become the major importer of slavesinto the Americas. The Triangular Trade route would soon come intoexistence as manufactured goods were sent to Africa, African slaveswere sent to the Americas, and sugar, coffee, and tobacco were shippedto Europe. The slaves had a hard life in the Americas, however theywould strain to keep their African culture.The Columbian Exchange would also play a big role in European tradeas the transfer of food, plants, and animals would take place betweenthe Americas and Europe. The entire world would get caught up in tradeand capitalism in what is today called global trade.IMPACTHOME

9 Fall of the Roman Empire
In the third century A.D., Rome facedmany problems. They came from bothwithin the empire and from the outside.1) Weakened economy: Hostile tribesfrom outside the empire and pirates onthe Mediterranean Sea disrupted trade.With new sources of gold and silverlacking, the government raised taxes.Rome minted coins with less gold andsilver, thereby bringing down the value.Overworked soil had lost it’s ability toproduce crops, and harvests becamemeager. Wars had also disrupted lotsof farmland. Soon, food shortagesand disease spread, and populationfell.2) Military and political turmoil: Romebegan to recruit outside sources fortheir military as Roman soldiersbecame less loyal to Rome and moreloyal to their commanders. Citizensalso became more indifferent to theempire’s fate. People felt serving ingovernment was now a burden insteadof a privilege.3) Threat from the north: As with China,nomadic warriors threatened theempire. Germanic tribes such as theHuns, Vandals, Visigoths, andOstrogoths would soon bring down theempire.hyperlink to FeudalismFeudalismIMPACTByzantine Empire The Empire of Byzantium was the eastern portion of the Roman Empire, which was divided in 395 A.D. Its capital of Constantinople, located on a peninsula, was naturally secure from invasion on three sides, and its fourth side was fortified with a network of three walls that withstood direct attack for over a thousand years. Its stable economy provided a strong military and, together with an abundant food supply and advanced civil engineering, a high standard of living. Christianity was firmly entrenched in Byzantium, and literacy was more widespread there than in any other nation in the middle ages. Nevertheless, Byzantium remained the most stable nation of the middle ages. Its central location between western Europe and Asia not only enriched its economy and its culture but allowed it to serve as a barrier against aggressive barbarians from both areas. Its rich tradition (strongly influenced by the church) preserved ancient knowledge upon which splendid art, architecture, literature and technological achievements were built. It is not an altogether unfounded assumption that the Renaissance could not have flourished were it not for the groundwork laid in Byzantium.IMPACTHOME

10 Stalin’s Russia (873-879) Economic Control IMPACT Social Control
BACK TORUSSIANREVOLUTIONStalin’s Russia ( )Economic ControlAfter Lenin suffered a stroke in 1922,Stalin made the move to gain the topposition in the Communist Party. Stalinwas cold, hard, and impersonal. Duringhis early days in the Bolsheviks, hechanged his name to Stalin, which means“Man of Steel”. By 1928, Stalin was intotal control of the Communist Party,wrestling power away from Leon Trotsky,who Stalin would later order killed.Stalin would become a totalitarianruler, taking control of every aspect ofpublic and private life. Stalin would builda totalitarian state in Russia, using secretpolice and controlling all of the media.Anyone threatening his power would beeliminated.Stalin would have total control of theUSSR economically, politically, andsocially.As Stalin gained control of society, he wassetting plans in motion to overhaul the economy. He announced “Weare a good fifty or a hundred years behind the advanced countries. Wemust make good this distance in ten years”.1) In 1928 Stalin called for a command economy, a system in whichthe government makes all economic decisions.2) An industrial revolution. Stalin outlined the first of several Five-Yearplans for the development of the Soviet Union economy. Impossiblyhigh quotas were set for the production of steel, coal, oil, andelectricity. To reach these goals, consumer goods were limited. As aresult, consumers faced shortages of housing, food, and clothing.3) Agricultural Revolution. In 1928, the government seized over 25million privately owned farms and combined them into large collectivefarms. When the Ukrainian Kulaks resisted, Stalin ordered peasantsonto the farms or forced a famine. Between 5-10 million would die.IMPACTSocial ControlStalin’s totalitarian rule revolutionized Sovietsociety. The change in people’s lives came at great cost as people losttheir freedoms, dissent was prohibited, and goods were scarce.1) Men and Women were declared equals. Under Stalin, women had nochoice but to join the labor force. The state provided care for theirchildren, which the state used as a means to educate the children. By1950, women made up 75% of Soviet doctors. They were alsoscientists, electricians, and construction workers.2) Government controlled all education and were taught the virtues ofthe Communist Party. Anyone who questioned the Communist Partyrisked losing their jobs or faced imprisonment.3) Religious teachings were replaced with the ideals of communism.Propaganda was used to attack religion. The Russian OrthodoxChurch was the main target of persecution. The police destroyedchurches and many religious leaders were killed or sent to prison.IMPACTHOME

11 European Renaissance Age of Exploration
The movement that started in Italycaused an explosion of creativity in art,writing, and thought that lastedapproximately Historianscall this period the Renaissance, whichmeans rebirth. A revival in art andlearning as well as a desire to bring backGreek and Roman culture led to a newage. The Crusades showed the Christianworld the wealth of Asian goods andItaly, being on the Mediterranean, wasthe first to take advantage. A competitionbetween the European countries wouldsoon take place in an attempt to gainwealth. Countries such as Spain andPortugal followed by France and Englandwould explore the unknown with thesame sense of adventure found duringthe Renaissance. The questioning spiritof the renaissance would also lead tothe Protestant Reformation as peoplewould begin to question the CatholicChurch and their practices.Age of Explorationhyperlink to Age of ExplorationIMPACThyperlink to ReformationProtestant ReformationIMPACTHOME

12 Golden Age of Greece (Democracy)
The Greeks were the first to use democracyas a form of government. Under Pericles,male citizens in Athens participated in thedaily running of government. This form ofdirect democracy excluded all non-citizenssuch as slaves and women. Theseachievements were mainly confined to thecity-state of Athens, where a strongeconomy and good government created theconditions necessary for such advancements.Democracy was developed between 461 and429 B.C.Many countries today still enjoy a form ofdemocracy, most notably the United States.While Draco, King Solon, and Cleisthenesintroduced forms of democracy, Greecewould reach its Golden Age under the rule ofPericles. Pericles had three goals:to strengthen Athenian Democracyto hold and strengthen the empireto glorify AthensPolitical To strengthen democracy, Pericles increased the number of public officials who were paid salaries. Earlier in Athens, most positions in public office were unpaid. Thus, only the wealthier Athenian citizens could afford to hold public office. Now even the poorest citizen could serve if elected or chosen by lot. Consequently, Athens had more citizens engaged in self-government than any other city-state in Greece. This reform made Athens one of the most democratic governments in history. The introduction of direct democracy, a form of government in which citizens rule directly and not through elected representatives, was an important legacy in Periclean Athens. Few other city-states practiced this type of government. In Athens, male citizens who serve din the assembly established all of the important government policies that affected the polis (city-state).IMPACTSocial The Golden Age of Greece was also a time of great art and architecture. Pericles’ goal was to have the greatest Greek artists and architects create magnificent sculptures and buildings to glorify Athens. At the center of his plan was one of architecture’s noblest works – the Parthenon. A masterpiece of design and craftsmanship was based on architecture that had been used to create Greek temples 200 years earlier. Phidias sculpted most of the work in the parthenon, including a 30 foot statue of the Greek goddess Athena. Phidias and other sculptors during this golden age aimed to create figures that were graceful, strong, and perfectly formed. Their values of harmony, order, balance, and proportion became the standard of what is known as classical art. The Greeks also invented drama and built the first theaters in the west. Theater productions were both an expression of civic pride and a tribute to the gods. Tragedy and comedy were the best known types of dramas. Plays based on wars and poking fun at politicians showed the freedom and openness that existed in Athens.IMPACTHOME

13 Queen Elizabeth IElizabeth inherited a tattered realm: dissension between Catholics and Protestants tore at the very foundation of society; the royal treasury had been bled dry by Mary and her advisors, Mary's loss of Calais left England with no continental possessions for the first time since the arrival of the Normans in 1066 and many (mainly Catholics) doubted Elizabeth's claim to the throne. Continental affairs added to the problems - France had a strong foothold in Scotland, and Spain, the strongest western nation at the time, posed a threat to the security of the realm. Elizabeth proved most calm and calculating (even though she had a horrendous temper) in her political acumen, employing capable and distinguished men to carrying out her royal wishes.Political: Her first order of business was to eliminate religious unrest. Elizabeth lacked the fanaticism of her siblings, Edward VI favored Protestant radicalism, Mary I, conservative Catholicism, which enabled her to devise a compromise where she would be tolerant of religions. She was, however, compelled to take a stronger Protestant stance for two reasons: the workings of Mary Queen of Scots and persecution of continental Protestants by the two strongholds of Orthodox Catholicism, Spain and France. The situation with Mary Queen of Scots was most vexing to Elizabeth. Mary, in Elizabeth's custody beginning in 1568 (for her own protection from radical Protestants and disgruntled Scots), gained the loyalty of Catholic factions and instituted several-failed assassination/overthrow plots against her cousin, Elizabeth. After irrefutable evidence of Mary's involvement in such plots came to light, Elizabeth sadly succumbed to the pressure from her advisors and had the Scottish princess executed in 1587.IMPACTSocial: Elizabeth's reign was during one of the more constructive periods in English history. Literature bloomed through the works of Spenser, Marlowe and Shakespeare. Francis Drake and Walter Raleigh were instrumental in expanding English influence in the New World. Elizabeth's religious compromise laid many fears to rest. Fashion and education came to the fore because of Elizabeth's penchant for knowledge, courtly behavior and extravagant dress. Good Queen Bess, as she came to called, maintained a regal air until the day she died; a quote, from a letter by Paul Hentzen, reveals the aging queen's regal nature: "Next came the Queen in the sixty-fifth year of her age, as we were told, very majestic; her face oblong, fair, but wrinkled; her eyes small yet black and pleasant; her nose a little hooked; her lips narrow... she had in her ear two pearls, with very rich drops... her air was stately; her manner of speaking mild and obliging." This regal figure surely had her faults, but the last Tudor excelled at rising to challenges and emerging victorious.IMPACTHOME

14 River Valley Civilizations
After the Neolithic Revolution, man began tosettle. The fertile soil from the rivers suppliedthem with a place to grow crops. The riverscould also be used to transport goods.Early civilizations would begin in the rivervalleys of China, Mesopotamia, Indus, andEgypt.Once man began to settle and civilizationsbegan to develop, laws and religion wasneeded to keep society in order.Social - The early river people depended greatly on the annual rainfall and the fertile soil of the rivers to sustain life. A poor rain season would result in crop failures. Too much rain would result in disastrous flooding. Man turned to appeasing the gods to guarantee them a good harvest.The Sumerians of Mesopotamia believed that many gods controlled the various forces of nature. Enlil, the god of storms and air was the most powerful god. Sumerians feared him as “the raging flood that has no rival.” Humans were nothing but servants to the gods and at any time, the mighty anger of the gods might strike, sending a fire, a flood, or an enemy to destroy the city. To keep the gods happy, the Sumerians built impressive ziggurats for them and offered richsacrifices of animals, food, and wine. Sumerians were also credited with inventing the wheel, the sail, and the plow. They were also the first to use bronze. They also invented a number system still in use today using the number 60 (60 seconds, 360 degrees etc.). With this knowledge, they were able to design arches, pyramids, and columns. They also invented cuneiform (writing)IMPACThyperlink to Code of HammurabiGovernment – In order to distribute and keep control over food supply in times of crisis, governments were formed. The most famous of these was the Code of Hammurabi which gave consistent laws throughout the Babylonian empire.IMPACTHOME

15 Mao Zedong Social IMPACT Economic IMPACT HOME

GLOBAL REGENTS THEMATIC ESSAY TOPICS AND DBQ SINCE 2001 (Global Regents Review Sheet)

ESSAY TIPS FOR BOTH ESSAYS

 

NOTE - THE COMPLETE ESSAYS AND EXAMS CAN BE FOUND AT THE BOARD OF REGENTS WEBSITE. THIS IS MERELY A BRIEF SUMMARY OF WHAT THE ESSAYS WERE ABOUT.

2017

January

THEMATIC - Needs and Wants - Select two natural resources and/or products. Explain why they were needed, and how they impacted a civilization, empire and/or a reigion.  (Coal, Oil, Diamonds, Salt, Gold, Tea, Spices)

DBQ - Actions taken by the British Empire to control India, and the impact of their rule on the people and/or region.

 

2016

January

THEMATIC - Imperialism - Select a country that engaged in imperialism, explain why they imperialized, and how imperialism affected the conquered and/or the conqueror. (Britain, Japan, France, Spain)

DBQ - Impact of Laws on society: Tukugawa Shogunate, Nazis, Republic of South Africa.

June

THEMATIC - Geography - Explain how two geographical obstacles were overcome by technology. (terrace farming,  caravel ships over the Atlantic, roads in the Andes, canals)

DBQ - Division of countries and its effect on people: Germany post WWII, Palestine, and British India.

August

THEMATIC - Belief Systems  - Explain two religions and show how they influenced society and/or a region. (Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, Shintoism)

DBQ - Problems caused by pollution and urbanization, and the degree to which these problems have been solved.

 

2015

January

THEMATIC - Geography - choose two geographic conditions and show how they influenced social, political, and/or economic history of a country or region.  (Monsoons in India, Nile Floods, island isolation for Japan, Greek mountains separate each polis, ancient rivers).

DBQ - People who spoke about problems: Bartolome de Las Casas, Robespierre, and Gandhi.

June

THEMATIC - Belief System Movements - Explain a central principle of a belief system, and how that belief system spread and influenced a society or region. (Hinduism, Islam, Judaism, or other belief systems)

DBQ - Decline of Empires and the impact on society: Rome, Ottoman Empire, British.

August

THEMATIC - Movement of People and Goods - Explain how two groups or ideas moved from one place to another. Discuss how the movement influenced a group or society. (Religions, sugar, silk, salt, Columbian Exchange)

DBQ - Actions of people looking to increase power: Stalin, Pol Pot, Louis XIV.

 

 

2014

January

THEMATIC - Human Rights - Choose 2 defenders of human rights, explain how they defended human rights, and the extent to which they were successful. (Gandhi's civil disobedience, Mandela ends apartheid, Locke promotes life, liberty, and property rights in the Enlightenment)  

DBQ - People changing environments (irrigation in Egypt, construction in Mesoamerica, coal mining in Great Britain) 

 

June

THEMATIC - Change - Individuals who Challenged Tradition - Choose two people who challenged tradition and evaluate the success of their challenge. (Gandhi and civil disobedience, Martin Luther and the Reformation, Lenin and Russian Revolution)

DBQ - Turning Points of the plague, Treaty of Nanjing, and assassination of Franz Ferdinand.

 

August

THEMATIC - Change - Leaders who brought change - Discuss how two leaders came to power, one policy or practice of each leader, and how that policy affected the people. (Gorbachev and Glasnost/Perestroika, Napoleon's Code,  William and Mary's Glorious Revolution and Bill of Rights)

DBQ - The global issues of armed conflict, disease, and child labor.

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2013

January

THEMATIC - Change - Collapse of Governments. Choose 2 government collapses and explain their circumstances and results. (Roman Empire leads to fragmented Europe, execution of Louis XVI ends the monarchy and eventually leads to the Reign of Terror, fall of the Shah leads to Iranian Revolution and rise of the Ayatollah, fall of Communism creates new nations and war in Eastern Europe)

DBQ - Effect of salt, cotton, and sugar on societies and regions.

June

THEMATIC - Change - Revolutions. Choose 2 Revolutions and explain their historical circumstances and effects. (French Revolution, Russian Revolution, Neolithic Revolution, Green Revolution)

DBQ - Technological advances by the Mongols (bow and stirrup), Spanish (caravel ships for exploration), and in India (railroads).

August

THEMATIC - Armed Conflict. Explain the circumstances of two armed conflicts and how they affected a country or specific group. (French Revolution, World War I, World War II, Sepoy Rebellion, Opium War)

DBQ - Economic development leads to change in Mexico, Botswana, and China.

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2012

January

THEMATIC - Individuals who developed or modified ideas. Explain the historical circumstances that led to the idea, an action taken because of this idea, and how the idea affected society. (Gandhi's civil disobedience, Martin Luther's 95 Theses, Karl Marx's Communist Manifesto).  

DBQ - Transportation methods unify and/or control regions. (Railroads, canals, and roads).

 

June

THEMATIC - Geography promoting or limiting interactions. Choose two geographic features, and show how they either limited or promoted human interaction. (Island geography isolated Japan, Mountains isolated the Greek polis, Sahara Desert isolated North from Sub-Saharan Africa, Nile River and Mediterranean Sea increased interactions).

DBQ - Autocratic rule helped and hindered a ruler's country. Shi Huangdi, Peter the Great, and Louis XIV.

 

August

THEMATIC - New technology changing existing technology. Describe two innovations and their effects on society or the world. (Gunpowder, printing press, nuclear power, aqueducts).

DBQ - Protest movements and reactions of the government to such protests. Women's Rights in Britain, Anti-Apartheid in South Africa, and pro-democracy in China.

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2011

January

THEMATIC - Geographicalfeatures influencing history and development of history. Select 3 features. (Industrial Revolution in England, Japan's isolated island, fertile crescent of Mesopotamia)

DBQ - Heliocentrism, Marxism, and Natural Rights. Choose two and explain the idea, as well as the impact on society.

 

June

THEMATIC - Technology. Show the positive or negative effects of two innovations (astrolobe, nuclear weapons, satellites)

DBQ - Human Rights violations in Ukraine, Rwanda, and Cambodia.

 

August

THEMATIC - Change - Choose two global issues since WWII, and show how solutions to those issues. (Nuclear Weapons, Deforestation, Terrorism, AIDS, Pollution)

DBQ - Conquest of the Mongols, Ottomans, and Spanish. Explain the reasons for conquest, how it was achieved, and the impact.

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2010 

January

THEMATIC - Culture and Intellectual Life. Choose two philosophers or leaders, and explain their impact. (Gandhi, Locke, Mao, Napoleon, Aristotle)

DBQ - Agrarian, Green, and Neolithic Revolution.  (Choose 2)

June

THEMATIC - Change. Choose any 2 individuals who changed the world and explain how. Explain the specific idea and how it influenced a group or region. (Locke, Bolivar, Marx, Mandela)

DBQ - Geography. Choose from deserts, monsoons, and cold climates.

August

THEMATIC- Select a Nationalistic movement, explain causes, events, and results. (WWI, WWII, Otto von Bismarck, Bolivar)

DBQ - Belief Systems and their impact on society.

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2009

January

THEMATIC - Geography as either a promoter or hindrance to cultural diffusion. Choose 2 examples. (Japan's isolated island, Greek polis affected by mountains, the New World across the Atlantic Ocean)

DBQ - Leonardo da Vinci, Toussaint L'Ouverture, or Mohandas K. Gandhi. Choose 2, and explain achievements and impact on society.

June

THEMATIC - Human Rights Violations. Choose 2 examples, explain the history and why rights were violated, then discuss actions taken to end the violation. (Holocaust, pogroms, apartheid, Tiananmen Square.)

DBQ - Economic and Social Changes during the Middle Ages, Globalization, or Industrial Revolution (choose 2)

August 

THEMATIC - Belief Systems. Choose 2 and explain impact on society. (Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, Confucianism)

DBQ - Usage and control of waterways and its political or economic effects.

ESSAY TIPS FOR BOTH ESSAYS

 

2008

January

THEMATIC - Change - Describe non-political revolutions (Scientific, Neolithic, Industrial, etc). Discuss the change and impact on society.

DBQ - Russia under the rule of Peter the Great, Germany under Adolf Hitler,and China under the rule of Mao Zedong. Choose 2 and explain impact on society.

June

THEMATIC - Belief Systems. Choose 2 and explain the religion, and the influence on followers life. (Hinduism, Buddhism, Islam, Confucianism)

DBQ - Genocide, Weapons of Mass Destruction, threats to the environment. Choose 2. Describe the problem, and attempts to end it.

August

THEMATIC - Geography ... Humans modifying lands or environment. Choose 2 (Berlin Wall, Great Wall of China are examples given.)

DBQ - Migrations ... Choose 2. Jews to Palestine and Israel, Hindus and Muslims between India and Pakistan, and Africans to the Americas. Describe impact.

ESSAY TIPS FOR BOTH ESSAYS

 

2007

January

THEMATIC - Human Rights Violations. Choose two groups who experienced human rights violations, and the extent to which it was resolved. (Holocaust, Tiananmen Square, Cambodia, pogroms)

DBQ - French Revolution. The causes and impact.

 

 

June

THEMATIC - Political Change. Choose 1 example and explain why a government wanted change, how they changed, and the result. (Meiji Restoration, 5 Year Plan, Rise of Fascism, etc)

DBQ - Manorialism, Mercantilism, Communism. Choose 2 of these economic systems.

August

THEMATIC - Political Systems. Explain 2 systems and how they changed the world. (Communism, Monarchy, Direct Democracy, etc)

DBQ - Natural Resources helped or hindered societies. Coal, water, diamonds, oil.

ESSAY TIPS FOR BOTH ESSAYS

 

2006

January

THEMATIC - Change / Philosophers. Choose two philosophers or leaders and explain how they changed one nation. (Bismarck, Lenin, Gandhi, Locke, etc)

DBQ - Discuss imperialism from the point of view of both the imperialist, and the colonized.

June

THEMATIC - Conflict. Explain one conflict, its causes, opposing groups, and resolution. (French Revolution, WWI, WWII, Apartheid, Crusades)

DBQ - Positive and Negative effects of the Industrial Revolution.

August

THEMATIC - Trade Routes. Discuss 2, and explain the positive or negative effects. (OPEC, EU, Silk Roads, Trans Sahara Trade)

DBQ - The Cold War affecting other nations around the world (Europe, Asia, Latin America).

ESSAY TIPS FOR BOTH ESSAYS

 

2005

January

THEMATIC - Change / 20th Century. Choose 2 20th Century political events, explain them, and show their impact on society. (Rise and Fall of Communism, Cultural Revolution, End of apartheid, Berlin Wall construction or dismantling, etc)

DBQ - Conquest of the Mongols, Spanish, and French. Choose 2. Show the political, social, and/or economic impacts of their conquests.

 

 

June

THEMATIC - Global Problems. Explain causes of a global problem, and ways it has affected a nation or region. (Desertification, spread of disease, deforestation, overpopulation, etc)

DBQ - Causes and outcomes of Wars.

August

THEMATIC - Change / Leaders. Choose two leaders who created change. Explain the situation, how change occurred, and how it affected society. (Gandhi, Bolivar, Lenin, Napoleon, Mao Zedong)

DBQ - Printing Press, Steam Power, Atomic Bomb. Explain how technology changed the world. Choose 2.

ESSAY TIPS FOR BOTH ESSAYS

 

2004

January

THEMATIC - Change (Individuals) Choose two historical figures, explain their ideas, and how they positively or negatively affected the world. (Gandhi, Bolivar, Stalin, Locke, Napoleon, Hitler, Mussolini, Gutenberg, Mandela, Mao, Aristotle)

DBQ - Neolithic Revolution, Scientific Revolution, Green Revolution. Choose two and explain the changes resulting from them.

 

June

THEMATIC - Turning Points. Choose two turning point events, explain them, and explain their impact. (French Revolution, WWI, WWII, Renaissance, Crusades)

DBQ - British Imperialism. Discuss the causes, and negative effects.

August

THEMATIC - Economic Systems. Identify one society and one economic system used in that society. Give two features of that system, and show its impact on the society. (Industrial Revolution in England, Communism in the USSR.)

DBQ - World Epidemics. Describe why they spread, and the impact on a society or societies.

  ESSAY TIPS FOR BOTH ESSAYS

2003

January

THEMATIC - Change, Revolutions. Choose a revolution. Give the causes, effects, and changes that resulted. (French Revolution, Russian, Iranian)

DBQ - Geographic features affecting Japan and England.

June

THEMATIC - Conflict. Choose 2 ethnic, cultural, religious, or political conflicts. Show the causes and effects. (Crusades, Holocaust, Tiananmen Square Massacre)

DBQ - Neolithic Revolution, Age of Exploration, Fall of Communism. Choose 2 and explain why its a turning point, and if that turning point was positive or negative.

August

THEMATIC - Geography Physical and Human. Choose one society before 1500 AD, and explain how it was influenced by a geographic feature. (Mountains in Greece, Monsoons in Asia, Ganges River in India, Nile in Egypt, Fertile Crescent) Do the same for a people after 1500 AD. (England is an island, the Industrial Revolution began there. Russia could not be invaded by Napoleon or Hitler.)

DBQ - Nationalism and a positive or negative influence around the world.

ESSAY TIPS FOR BOTH ESSAYS

2002

January

THEMATIC - Geography. Choose 2 nations or regions and show how geography affected their history. (river valleys of Egypt or Mesopotamia, Monsoons or Himalaya Mountains in Asia)

DBQ - Economic changes to society.

 

June

THEMATIC - Geography. Human activity has altered the land. Show the change to the environment and how it helped or hindered society. (Irrigation, terrace farming, canal systems, use of nuclear power.)

DBQ - Human rights violations after WWII.

August

THEMATIC - Change. Choose two individuals who brought about change, and explain the effects of that change. (Mandela, Gandhi, Martin Luther, Locke.)

DBQ - Mass movement of people. Political, economic, and social implications. 

ESSAY TIPS FOR BOTH ESSAYS

2001

January

THEMATIC - Economic change. Show how industrialization affected 1 nation. Show 2 ways that it led to changes for workers. Show how workers, reformers, or the government responded to these changes.

DBQ - French, Chinese, and Iranian Revolutions. Choose 2, and show the causes, results, and degree of success.

June

THEMATIC - Geography. Select 1 geographic feature and how it affected the development of a society. (Fertile crescent, Japan isolated on an island, natural harbors of England, etc)

DBQ - Industrialization leading to environmental problems.

August

THEMATIC - Turning Points. Show 2 turning points in history. Show the causes and impacts. (French Revolution, Neolithic Revolution, WWI)

DBQ - Women in society. Social or political impacts on women in different societies.

ESSAY TIPS FOR BOTH ESSAYS

 

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