Erna Brodber Heaven On Earth Essay

Spring 2013

Dear Students,

Verify course selections in YES to see the complete selection of course dates and times when the Spring 2013 schedule goes live on October 29.

You will need to meet with you adviser IN PERSON before your registration appointment window at which time your adviser will release an electronic academic hold on your account so that you can register. Please email your adviser for an appointment. The name of your adviser as well as the time of your registration appointment window is listed on your YES landing page.

Instructors, sections, and topics for 100-level writing courses are subject to change after Course Request Period, depending on enrollments.

Admittance to Honors sections and 200-level Creative Writing workshops are subject to instructor approval.
See individual course listings for specific instructions.

  • Click here for courses meeting ethnic/non-western or pre-1800 literature major and minor requirements
  • Click here for dual-listed courses which may be counted toward the major
  • Click here for 100-level course descriptions
  • Click here for 200-level course descriptions

Note: The descriptions that appear below for Spring 2013 are grouped by course. If you do not find your section number, it means that that instructor has not yet provided a description.  The webmaster will make every effort to continually update this page, so please check back often.

Spring 2013 100-level English Courses:


ENGL 100 Composition

.01 MWF 210-300 West Hall 102 Porterfield

.02 TR 810-925 Sutherland House 106 Higgs

ENGL 102W Literature and Analytical Thinking

.01 MWF 910-1000 Buttrick Hall 308 Samuel

In this class, we will be examining a broad range of literature, music, film, and art by women writers and artists of the African diaspora. By doing so, we will consider how women writers uniquely approach topics that are crucial and recurring within the study of the African diaspora (i.e. – slavery; love, sexuality, and relationships). Why are women writers often relegated to the margins of various Afro-diasporic canons? In what ways do intersections of race and gender generate distinct concerns, political positions, and literary/artistic techniques? Authors will include acclaimed black women writers such as Octavia Butler, Jamaica Kincaid, and Ama Ata Aidoo, alongside art and spoken word poetry by artists such as Kara Walker and Staceyann Chin, a film selection, and musical selections from artists such as Janelle Monae, Nina Simone, and Erykah Badu. This class will also make use of social networking tools, such as Twitter, to facilitate learning. While we will use our course materials as a primary engine of our discussions, we will regularly ground our discussions in the real-world, large and small-scale, implications of our discussions.

Women of the African Diaspora

.02 MWF 1010-1100  Sutherland House 106 Anne Castro

What does it mean to just “be yourself?” This class will explore the many ways we perform in our daily lives and how we use different types of performance to define ourselves with and against others’ expectations.  We will look at numerous texts in which a character questions what it means to “perform” his or her own identity on and off the public stage. We will read and critically analyze poetry, drama, fiction, live performance, and film. The class will examine the ways in which different communities demand distinct representations of gender, sexuality, and race. Furthermore, we will see what happens when a person’s performance of his or her own identity clashes with cultural expectations.

.03 MWF 1010-1100 Stambaugh House 107 Boutelle

In 2011, Merriam-Webster added “bromance” to its US Dictionary, defined as “a close nonsexual relationship between men.” Although the term has only come to prominence in the last decade, thanks largely to the films of Judd Apatow, this course will explore these relationships across a variety of literary and film traditions. What possibilities are opened/closed in exploring male intimacy in this way? Why are these relationships definitively nonsexual? Where is line between bromance and homosexuality and, more importantly, why do we feel the need to ask/know? How do racial and cultural differences inflect these relationships? In addition to exploring these bonds between men, we will also explore close female friendships and think critically about the different stakes of each. What is the connection between gender and belonging? This course will ask us to reevaluate the ways we understand race, gender, sexuality, and (non)sexual desire through the lens of bromances and sisterhoods.

.04 MWF 1110-1200 Sutherland House 106

.05 MWF 910-1000 Memorial Hall 104 Barter

What do we mean when we talk about "justice?" To what extent do we measure a society by the structures it has in place to ensure the ministration of justice? In this course, we will examine works of fiction in order to ask questions about how justice systems exist and operate within dystopian societies. We will also examine other types of literature—court opinions, essays, and news articles—to identify how our familiar systems of justice sometimes produce dystopian results. Throughout all of our readings, we will work toward a deeper understanding of the relationship between these fraught concepts, and particularly the extent to which our definition of dystopia depends on deeply ingrained notions of "justice." Readings will include young adult fiction such as The Hunger Games and The Giver, short works of fiction by Coetzee and Kafka, court opinions, poetry, and various historical texts.

.06MWF 910-1000 Gillette Hall 103 Mensah

.07 TR 810-925 West Hall 102 Pellarin

.08 TR 935-1050 Crawford House 208 Chance Woods

"Textual Identities" This course exposes students to the evolving conceptualizations of the self and of personhood through western culture from classical antiquity to the height of English Romanticism. One consistent theme of this intellectual trajectory will be the implications of orienting the self around technologies of writing. Writers such as Plato, Augustine, Dante, Shakespeare, and Coleridge dwelled at length on how writing and reading change human psychology and humans' disposition toward the world and others. Thus, this course will give students an opportunity to think about the very idea of writing and reading as they engage in the processes of reading and writing. We will consider how various media (e.g. the scroll, the codex, the manuscript, the printing press, the Internet) through history have fundamentally altered our manner of conceptualizing the world and our place in it. The course thereby presents students with the unique opportunities to engage in the meta-cognitive practice of writing about writing through history and to consider their current place in the evolution of discursive media in modern culture.

.09 TR 1100-1215 Gillette Hall 103 DeGuzman

Islands – pieces of land surrounded by water – serve as potent locations for the literary imagination. They have been called upon to evoke individual isolation, rousing adventure, and unspoiled paradise. But this course will approach such assumptions through the relationship between select islands of the Caribbean and another isolated landmass: Britain. With colonialism as our broadest framework, we will explore what happens when the cultures of freestanding pieces of land meet one another. What popular myths exist about the Caribbean and Britain as a result of their status as islands? In what ways have the cultures of both locales spread into one another, as well as across the globe? Could we ultimately describe a particular insecurity that comes with being from and living on islands? Our discussions will question the history of colonialism, the function of the literary canon, and the industry of tourism. We will consider these topics in various ways as we read and write about works by William Shakespeare, John Ruskin, C.L.R. James, Kamau Brathwaite, V.S. Naipaul, Michelle Cliff, and Dorothea Smartt.

.10 TR 110-225 Murray House 206 Fang

.11 TR 235-350 Furman 209 Quigley

Seeing Green: Imagining the “Natural” To what do we refer when we invoke “nature,” “the natural,” and their opposites? How did we come up with these terms in the first place, and how are their meanings context-specific? In this course, we will not arrive at definitive answers to these questions, but we will explore them vigorously. Our investigations will carry us through broad expanses of time and space, and toward a wide variety of cultural products that offer themselves – more and less obviously – to our lines of inquiry. Expect to engage with travel writing, with the novel, with poetry, with film, with drama, and more besides. Expect, too, to focus intently on developing the faculties of criticism, argumentation, and, most importantly of all, writing: students will regularly submit brief reading responses in addition to the course’s longer essay assignments.

.12 TR 235-350 Murray House 206 Saborido

.13 TR 400-515 Buttrick Hall 112 Hines

The Modern South? The Southern Modern?  “…the quality that most truly sets the South apart from other regions, its sheer investment in the meaning of itself.” -John Jeremiah Sullivan, New York Times, 6/28/2012

This course will critically explore and challenge the Southern “investment in the meaning of itself” as well as the investment in the meaning of the South by the rest of the country, and the rest of the world. We will tackle this mode of place-making by testing and eliding our own assumptions of what it might mean to be Southern and what it might mean to be American without a South at all. These paths will be tested through an intensive semester of writing critical essays addressing our shared reading, which will include texts by Jesmyn Ward, W.E.B. DuBois, Zora Neale Hurston, and William Faulkner.

.14 TR 400-515 West Hall 107 Bagneris

ENGL 104W: Prose Fiction; Forms and Techniques

.01 MWF 910-1000 Calhoun Hall 203 Bernard

Insides In this course we will investigate literature that attempts to confront and distort our perception of the world through its portrayal of the interiority of the mind. What does your brain look like on the inside—are there couches, chairs, birds? How might literary tools such as point of view, metaphor, characterization, etc. be used to define the interior space of the mind, particularly as it confronts the exterior world? Why is this space necessary to explore? Through analysis and close-readings of select novels, novellas and short stories we will learn to think critically and creatively about the elements of fiction in order to generate thoughtful discussions about the ability of language to capture (or not capture) that which is impossible to see. Ultimately, this is a course that focuses on honing not only your critical thinking skills but your writing as well. Therefore, during the course of the semester, you will produce three essays that demonstrate your ability to form meaningful and persuasive arguments using textual evidence, while synthesizing the ideas you find most compelling.

.02 MWF 1110-1200 West Hall 102 Miller

.03 MWF 1210-100 Gillette Hall 103 Spigner

Mythmaking and the American Imagination: This course will focus primarily but not exclusively upon 19th- and 20th-Century American fiction.  Reading widely across the two centuries, the American-authored short stories and novels at the center of the class include ancient mythological forms, allusions, themes, and concerns. Throughout the semester, we will consider the ways that classical myths influenced American storytelling, cultural constructions, and national identity. The American texts include but are not limited to The Red Badge of Courage, Of One Blood, selections from Aesop's Fables, and Wonder Woman.  Additionally, we will read portions of Bulfinch's Mythology, the French novella Undine (in translation), and Frankenstein. Students will write two papers and several short reflection papers, lead discussion at least once during the semester, and participate regularly in class. 

.04 MWF 310-400 Buttrick Hall 306 Birdsong

.05 MWF 210-300 TBA Justin Quarry

Monsters in Fiction~In this course, we will explore portrayals of various monsters—both realistic and fantastic—in narratives ranging from the late nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries and analyze the elements of fiction used to illuminate them and in turn the societal anxieties and desires in the midst of which they appear. Likewise, we will attempt to define, and perhaps redefine, what, or who, exactly, a "monster" is and what makes a such a creature simultaneously horrifying and fascinating, and we will proceed to examine novels, graphic novels, and short stories in order to determine the terms by which so-called monsters are understood and described, and what beyond the norm these creatures represent, both literally and metaphorically, in each encounter.

Moreover, however, the aim of this course is to teach you to think critically about literature, and so we also will devote a significant amount of time to focusing on the writing process by way of close readings, discussions, and writing assignments. Throughout the semester, you will practice analyzing and critiquing our selected literary works in three essays as well as several reading responses and in-class writing assignments, each intended to help you more clearly and more persuasively present your arguments by basing them on textual evidence.

ENGL 116W: Introduction to Poetry   

.01MWF 845-1000 Calhoun Hall 219 Wollaeger

.02 MWF 1010-1100 Hank Ingram House 210 Kinard

.03 MWF 1110-1200 Calhoun Hall 203 Bradley

.04 MWF 1210-100 Wilson Hall 122

.06 MWF 110-200 Calhoun Hall 103 Lisa Dordal

The main objectives of this course are to widen your knowledge of poetry, to help you become close readers of poetry, and to help you develop your critical writing skills. The first part of this course will be organized around formal considerations (diction, tone, figures of speech, sound, rhythm, etc.). The second part of the course will include brief case studies of Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, Sylvia Plath and Langston Hughes, as well as several thematic case studies. Requirements will include three papers (plus three revisions), one midterm exam, and several brief response papers. 

.07 MWF 310-400 Calhoun Hall 106 Lisa Dordal

The main objectives of this course are to widen your knowledge of poetry, to help you become close readers of poetry, and to help you develop your critical writing skills. The first part of this course will be organized around formal considerations (diction, tone, figures of speech, sound, rhythm, etc.). The second part of the course will include brief case studies of Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, Sylvia Plath and Langston Hughes, as well as several thematic case studies. Requirements will include three papers (plus three revisions), one midterm exam, and several brief response papers.

.08 TR 935-1050 Murray House 206 Sarah Kersh

Poetry is a particularly rich and rewarding genre; it is also frequently a difficult one. Our focus will be on the analysis, appreciation, and craft of poetry through the study of a variety of poetic forms. While our focus will be on poems in English, we will read poems from a wide range of periods, places, and genres. Utilizing a number of learning strategies we will develop a vocabulary for the understanding of poetry and effective tools for the verbal and written analysis of it. To succeed in this course, students must be willing to think openly about how they interact with language and the world around them, as well as seriously pursue the questions: What is poetry? Where do we find poetry? And why should we study poetry at all?

.09 TR 1100-1215 Sutherland House 106 Sarah Kersh

Poetry is a particularly rich and rewarding genre; it is also frequently a difficult one. Our focus will be on the analysis, appreciation, and craft of poetry through the study of a variety of poetic forms. While our focus will be on poems in English, we will read poems from a wide range of periods, places, and genres. Utilizing a number of learning strategies we will develop a vocabulary for the understanding of poetry and effective tools for the verbal and written analysis of it. To succeed in this course, students must be willing to think openly about how they interact with language and the world around them, as well as seriously pursue the questions: What is poetry? Where do we find poetry? And why should we study poetry at all?

.10 MWF 210-300 Sutherland House 106 Cosner

.11 TR 810-925 Calhoun Hall 117

ENGL 117W: Introduction to Literary Criticism

.02 TR 1100-1215 Stevenson Center 1117 Eatough

This course provides a survey of several theoretical approaches that have influenced literary criticism in the past decade. Readings will consist of works from philosophy, sociology, psychology, cultural studies, gender studies, and, of course, literary studies, with an eye toward how these methodologies provide us with tools for interpreting literature. The specific theoretical lenses we will be investigating will include world literature, the sociology of literature, post-secularism, Marxism, alternative modernities, affect theory, and surface reading. Assignments will consist of several short papers and one longer paper, each of which will require you to either: a) explicate a theoretical text; or b) apply a single theoretical model to a particular literary text.

.04 MW 1135-1250 Stambaugh House Humberto Garcia

How are words stitched together so as to create “literature?” By what means does a poem, novel, play, or film continue to live in the past, present, and future? And what are the tools through which readers are to dissect these monstrous creations? This writing-intensive course will look for answers to these questions by investigating one aptly chosen specimen of a living textual corpse—Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818). We will read and re-read this twentieth-century cult classic from a wide variety of critical approaches to literature, i.e. the theoretical frameworks by which we bestow value and meaning onto literary texts. The goal of this experiment is to develop your ability to ready closely and intensively, think critically, and write and revise extensively. We will observe how interpretations of Shelley’s novel shift according to different schools of criticism (i.e. formalism, Marxism, psychoanalysis, feminism, postcolonial theory, etc.), while adopting an inter-textual approach that considers the influential works of William Godwin (her father), Mary Wollstonecraft (her mother), and Edmund Burke (romantic theorist) as well as film adaptations of the mythic figure of “Frankenstein” (the monster and/or the scientist). By the end of the semester, you will have produced a well-written, well-theorized paper on this novel and mastered the critical reading skills that will be of value to you long after this course has ended.

This course is designed to foster intense class discussion, develop original ideas, and improve your writing. To achieve these goals, students will learn to use multi-media and blogs to communicate with a real public audience online, in addition to writing and revising a semester-long term paper. You are expected to think, write, create, and imagine wildly. Attendance and participation, in and out of class, are not just mandatory but essential to your success.

This course will examine the rise of American Literature in the United States from the end of the revolutionary period to the late-nineteenth-century. We will read the work of authors who shaped America’s literary landscape, challenged conventional wisdom, and who help us to imagine alternative literary histories in the US. As much as the course will provide students with a window on cultural responses to prominent issues from our nation’s past, it is also a course in developing the students’ general critical skills. As such, this course is designed to strengthen critical reading and writing skills as we examine literary texts to understand how writers use their work to preserve, disseminate, and analyze the social, cultural, and political issues of their day. Among the authors we will read are Lydia Maria Child, Harriet Wilson, and William Dean Howells.

ENGL 118W Introduction to Literary and Cultural Analysis

.01 MWF 810-900 Benson Hall 200 Hart

Reading the Detective: Sherlock Holmes  Detective fiction, as a genre, developed during the mid-nineteenth-century. The rest, as they say, is history. One need only turn on the television to witness the continued popularity of this genre. However, before the world was inundated with these detectives, there was one detective: Sherlock Holmes. Of course, Holmes was neither the first detective—that honor goes to Edgar Allan Poe’s Dupin—nor the only detective of his time; however, he remains the most popular and most influential character of the genre. As such, this course will allow students to learn about the genre of detective fiction through a comprehensive study of Sherlock Holmes, as both a literary character and as a cultural icon. Over the course of the semester, we will read several of the major works in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Holmes canon, and given the extent to which Doyle’s detective has captured the popular imagination since his “birth,” we will watch several film and television adaptations and read a few (of the very many) parodies, pastiches, and contemporary literary adaptations of Holmes. In reading and watching these texts, we will understand the ways in which detective fiction is concerned with narrative, ways of seeing/reading, ways of knowing, questions of identity, questions of interpretation, plot, character, and context. We will also be able to ask (and hopefully answer) a series of questions about both the genre and about Sherlock Holmes, among them: What are the conventions of detective fiction? How have these conventions endured and/or been modified over time? How do these tales reflect contemporary concerns in turn-of-the-century Britain? What are the recurrent themes in the Holmes canon? Why does Holmes resonate with modern audiences? How and why has Holmes been adapted over time? How do contemporary adaptations reflect contemporary concerns? What is the cultural significance of Sherlock Holmes? Along with Doyle’s Holmes stories, course texts may also include works by Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Robert Louis Stevenson, Loren D. Estleman, and Graham Moore.

.02 MWF 910-1000 Stevenson Center 6411 Briggs

.03 MWF 1010-1100 Gillette Hall 103

.04 MWF 1010-1100 Murray House 206 Hart

Reading the Detective: Sherlock Holmes  Detective fiction, as a genre, developed during the mid-nineteenth-century. The rest, as they say, is history. One need only turn on the television to witness the continued popularity of this genre. However, before the world was inundated with these detectives, there was one detective: Sherlock Holmes. Of course, Holmes was neither the first detective—that honor goes to Edgar Allan Poe’s Dupin—nor the only detective of his time; however, he remains the most popular and most influential character of the genre. As such, this course will allow students to learn about the genre of detective fiction through a comprehensive study of Sherlock Holmes, as both a literary character and as a cultural icon. Over the course of the semester, we will read several of the major works in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Holmes canon, and given the extent to which Doyle’s detective has captured the popular imagination since his “birth,” we will watch several film and television adaptations and read a few (of the very many) parodies, pastiches, and contemporary literary adaptations of Holmes. In reading and watching these texts, we will understand the ways in which detective fiction is concerned with narrative, ways of seeing/reading, ways of knowing, questions of identity, questions of interpretation, plot, character, and context. We will also be able to ask (and hopefully answer) a series of questions about both the genre and about Sherlock Holmes, among them: What are the conventions of detective fiction? How have these conventions endured and/or been modified over time? How do these tales reflect contemporary concerns in turn-of-the-century Britain? What are the recurrent themes in the Holmes canon? Why does Holmes resonate with modern audiences? How and why has Holmes been adapted over time? How do contemporary adaptations reflect contemporary concerns? What is the cultural significance of Sherlock Holmes? Along with Doyle’s Holmes stories, course texts may also include works by Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Robert Louis Stevenson, Loren D. Estleman, and Graham Moore.

.05 MWF 1210-100 Calhoun Hall 423 Hart

Reading the Detective: Sherlock Holmes  Detective fiction, as a genre, developed during the mid-nineteenth-century. The rest, as they say, is history. One need only turn on the television to witness the continued popularity of this genre. However, before the world was inundated with these detectives, there was one detective: Sherlock Holmes. Of course, Holmes was neither the first detective—that honor goes to Edgar Allan Poe’s Dupin—nor the only detective of his time; however, he remains the most popular and most influential character of the genre. As such, this course will allow students to learn about the genre of detective fiction through a comprehensive study of Sherlock Holmes, as both a literary character and as a cultural icon. Over the course of the semester, we will read several of the major works in Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s Holmes canon, and given the extent to which Doyle’s detective has captured the popular imagination since his “birth,” we will watch several film and television adaptations and read a few (of the very many) parodies, pastiches, and contemporary literary adaptations of Holmes. In reading and watching these texts, we will understand the ways in which detective fiction is concerned with narrative, ways of seeing/reading, ways of knowing, questions of identity, questions of interpretation, plot, character, and context. We will also be able to ask (and hopefully answer) a series of questions about both the genre and about Sherlock Holmes, among them: What are the conventions of detective fiction? How have these conventions endured and/or been modified over time? How do these tales reflect contemporary concerns in turn-of-the-century Britain? What are the recurrent themes in the Holmes canon? Why does Holmes resonate with modern audiences? How and why has Holmes been adapted over time? How do contemporary adaptations reflect contemporary concerns? What is the cultural significance of Sherlock Holmes? Along with Doyle’s Holmes stories, course texts may also include works by Mary Elizabeth Braddon, Robert Louis Stevenson, Loren D. Estleman, and Graham Moore.

.06 MWF 1210-100 Crawford House 208 Birdsong

.07 MWF 1210-100 Buttrick Hall 205 Jennifer Krause

Hybrid Identities and Cosmopolitanism~This course will consider certain transnational issues that have become dominant in contemporary literature, including cultural hybridity, global citizenship, postmodernism, and globalization. Using the concepts of hybrid identity and cosmopolitanism as a starting point, the course will ask: in an age defined by growing globalization, how do citizens of varied cultures and backgrounds confront an ever more inter-national existence? Is it plausible to find a fixed national identity in today’s world? What identifiable markers of identity are affected by our transnational interdependence? What aspects of culture act as catalysts for the hybridization we confront today? Texts will include literary and cultural theory, along with novels by William Gibson, Junot Diaz, Caio Fernando Abreu, and Max Brooks. We will also watch several films, including Scarface and Fight Club.

.08 TR 110-225 TBA Cosner

.09 MW 110-225 Furman 007 King

Memory, Mourning, and Melancholia: For whom do we mourn? This course explores loss and the ways in which it evokes a wide range of affective responses that include grief, depression, fixation, madness, guilt, and even rage. In particular, this class considers the following questions: What is the work of mourning? How is memory constructed, and what is its relationship to mourning? And how does one mourn, much less remember, a history that is elided, overlooked, or forgotten?

To address these questions, this course investigates various genres – film, novel, poetry, theory, and drama – that cross national and historical boundaries. Texts include the elegiac poetry of Ben Jonson and Amelia Lanyer, Thomas Kyd’s The Spanish Tragedy, Toni Morrison’s Home, Julia Kristeva’s Approaching Abjection, Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home, and Annemarie Jacir’s Salt of this Sea.

.10 TR 810-925 Garland Hall 101 Spivey

Why does the U.S. incarcerate so many of its own citizens, more than any other nation in the world? What role does prison play in the national imagination? In this course we will attempt to answer both questions through a study of literature by and about prisoners.  We'll begin the course with a short survey of nineteenth-century American authors (including Emily Dickinson, Edgar Allen Poe and Herman Melville) and examine the frequent motifs of solitude and confinement in their work. To trace changing attitudes toward punishment and incarceration and to broaden our own understanding of the effects of the modern, prison industrial complex, we'll study Truman Capote's twentieth-century classic, In Cold Blood, as well as several recent prison memoirs and two documentary films.

.11 TR 1100-1215 Stambaugh House 107 Spivey

Why does the U.S. incarcerate so many of its own citizens, more than any other nation in the world? What role does prison play in the national imagination? In this course we will attempt to answer both questions through a study of literature by and about prisoners.  We'll begin the course with a short survey of nineteenth-century American authors (including Emily Dickinson, Edgar Allen Poe and Herman Melville) and examine the frequent motifs of solitude and confinement in their work. To trace changing attitudes toward punishment and incarceration and to broaden our own understanding of the effects of the modern, prison industrial complex, we'll study Truman Capote's twentieth-century classic, In Cold Blood, as well as several recent prison memoirs and two documentary films.

.12 TR 110-225 Buttrick Hall 201 Tichi

.13 TR 235-350 West Hall 102 Eatough

In recent years, there has been a renewed interest among both novelists and literary critics in how literary experimentalism could form the basis for ethically-attentive political practices.  Where experimental literature from the first half of the twentieth century has often been charged with retreating from politics and focusing instead on overly complex narratives techniques, so-called “late modernist” works claim that experimentalism can help us to imagine new, more equitable socioeconomic systems.  In this course, we will assess the capacity of experimental fiction to imagine new ethical and political perspectives, looking in particular at how these texts encourage critical thinking and cultivate nuanced ideological positions.  Reading experimental fictions from Zadie Smith, Ben Okri, Thomas McCarthy, Will Self, and J. M. Coetzee, we will ask what sorts of communities these texts envision, how they describe the ways in which we can act in the world, and what role language and narrative plays in their understandings of political action.

.14 TR 400-515 Buttrick Hall 204 Eatough

.15 TR 400-515 Calhoun 219 Cosner

.16 MWF 1010-1100 Benson Hall 200 Krause

.17 MWF 110-200 Crawford House 208 Birdsong

.18 MWF 310-400 Buttrick Hall 201 Krause

.19 MW 110-225 Hank Ingram House 208

ENGL 120W: Intermediate Composition

.01 MWF 210-300 Buttrick Hall 201 Spivey

In this course, we will develop a sophisticated vocabulary for analyzing persuasive writing. We will explore the five canons of rhetoric, emphasizing practical strategies for inventing arguments and developing an effective written style. While the art of persuasion is ancient, we will apply it to issues both current and local. The Contributor, Nashville's twice-monthly street paper, will serve as a primary text for this course.

ENGL 122:Beginning Fiction Workshop

 .01 TR 935-1050 Buttrick Hall 202 Jimenez

Spring 2013 200-level English Courses:

ENGL 200: Intermediate Nonfiction Writing- Life writing: memoirs about people, places, historical moments

.01 W 210-500 Furman 202 Solomon

Of all the forms of creative nonfiction, memoir is arguably the most popular. Why so? Memoir writers create from the raw material of their own life a sustained narrative, one that addresses a distinct set of concerns. In so doing, writers of good memoirs transform that raw material into a story others can recognize as instructive, insightful, true to life.   Writers of good memoirs actively consider what is true in their recollections; they reconstruct the past with an insistence on accuracy and evaluate the past from the perspective of the writers’ present, more complex understanding. Writers of good memoirs attract readers because they give those readers a sense of discovery in the reading that parallels the writers’ own discoveries in the process of remembering and then writing about a set of experiences.    

Many common topics for memoir—overcoming hardship or illness, coping with substance abuse or tragedy, achieving celebrity, to name a few—may not readily lend themselves to student creative writing assignments. This course will concentrate instead on three kinds of experiences that offer interesting subject matter for most people: other people, places, and the historical moment. We will read memoirs of all three kinds, and then students will write memoirs that concentrate on these subjects.   The course will emphasize not just the writing, but also revision, the re-vision necessary to rework a draft: to imbue the narrative with more punch, to render the world in more depth, and to give the writing more clarity and interest. These concerns inform good writing in all genres.

Students who register for this class will join a waiting list at first. They should write a 250-word memoir about one family member—someone about whom they can offer a complex portrait—and then email that account to Solomon by January 3 with the subject heading, “English 200 Writing Sample.”   Then, in the week before the semester starts, Solomon will select class participants and email all people on the waiting list to tell them whether they have gained admission.

Note: Because enrollment to this course is by instructor approval based on a submission, all students will initially be placed on the waitlist. After joining the waitlist, all students should contact the instructor regarding the submission requirement. As soon as the instructor selects the class members, that select group of students will be enrolled in the course and all others will be dropped from the waitlist.

ENGL 201-01. Advanced Nonfiction Writing

.01 M 310-600 Buttrick Hall 316 Guralnick, P.

Limited enrollment. Admission to the workshop is by instructor permission, with re-enrollment by students who have previously taken the course subject to the same proviso. Interested students should register and contact the English Department about submitting a brief writing sample on an assigned topic, to be turned in before the December break.

This is a workshop on Creative Nonfiction, which revolves around the writing of the participants, with additional readings in work by such writers as Gay Talese, Gary Smith, Jack Kerouac, Wil Haygood, Ernest Hemingway, Rosanne Cash, and Alice Munro.

It will focus on issues of characterization, narrative technique, selectivity of detail, and angle of perception, with special emphasis on the profile – in other words, how to make a real-life story come alive in the same way that fictional narrative can.

This is a workshop in which we are all interdependent on each other's efforts.

Three major pieces of 2500-3000 words will be required, along with the possibility of some brief additional exercises. Every student in the course will critique each of the other students' papers in writing, and the class will consist primarily of constructive discussion of the work. Class participation is the second most important element of the class (after the writing itself), so attendance is of the highest importance. Most of all, the workshop is a kind of shared enterprise in which a mutual enthusiasm for writing (irrespective of the level of achievement) should make it engaging – and fun – for all. The only prerequisite is a commitment to effort and honest self-expression.

English 202: Literature and Craft of Writing

 .01 MW 110-225 Calhoun Hall 104 Nancy Reisman

Claiming Forms, Naming Worlds: Contemporary Women Short Story Writers~ In this course, we'll explore the work of several influential 20th and 21st century women short story writers, and delve into their various aesthetics, influences, formal and thematic concerns.   We'll consider their particular and changing visions of the short story form, the distinctive elements of voice and style, varieties of characterization and notions of self, and the generational and cultural moments from which these writers compose. We’ll consider the ways these writers explore relationship, desire, and place within their works; and we’ll discuss investigations of power within their representations and their forms. Among the writers we'll read and discuss: Grace Paley, Alice Munro, Angela Carter, Lorrie Moore, Deborah Eisenberg, Lydia Davis, Aimee Bender, Louise Erdrich and several others. This course is designed for students with an interest in fiction writing and the architecture of fiction; no fiction-writing experience is required. Course projects will include both creative and analytical written work.

ENGL 204: Intermediate Fiction Workshop

.01 MW 110-225 calhoun Hall 104 Lorraine Lopez

This section of creative writing focuses on building and refining techniques of fiction writing, applying the full palette of elements, as related to the short story. Fiction writing is a craft, as well as a discipline and a process. This course is designed to help students hone skills, such as, but not limited to developing convincing characters, using perspective judiciously and consistently, proportioning summary (exposition) appropriately to scene, depicting imagery that resonates metaphorically, and applying significant detail to steep the reader in the physical world of the story. To better apprehend and practices such techniques and others, students will write two original short stories, complete three writing exercises, attend and respond to three literary events, and analyze published short stories to discuss structural and stylistic components that contribute to these stories’ overall success, in addition to reading text on craft and critiquing original work by peers on a weekly basis.                                                    

Note: Because enrollment to this course is by instructor approval based on a submission, all students will initially be placed on the waitlist. After the instructor selects the class members, those students will be admitted by the department. After joining the waitlist, all students should contact the instructor regarding the submission requirement. 

ENGL 205: Advanced Fiction Workshop

.01 T 310-600 Buttrick Hall 309 Earley

.02 T 1220-310 Stevenson6 Center 411 Nancy Reisman

This workshop is designed as a forum for experienced fiction writers to expand their visions, refine their aesthetics, and consider questions about fictional form and art-making. We’ll focus mainly on short story forms, revisit some essential matters of craft and technique, and consider significant questions about time, perception, and spatial relationships in stories, uses of defamiliarization, and the roles of silence, among other issues. It’s my hope that the workshop will foster experimentation as well as enable writers to further develop established strengths. The reading and writing for the course will be literary fiction generally based in realism (extending to surrealism, magical realism, meta-fiction). The core questions remain: What material, style, methods of storytelling interest you the most and how can you best access that material? What is the potential and what are the apparent boundaries of different fictional forms? The heart of this course is the workshop: the development and discussion of your creative work-in-progress. We’ll also read and discuss published stories and essays on craft. Experience in the English 204 (Intermediate) workshop or equivalent strongly recommended.

Instructor permission required. Interested students should register for the wait list: at the end of the course selection period, I’ll contact all wait-listed writers with guidelines for writing samples.

ENGL 207: Advanced Poetry Workshop

 .01 M 210-500 Buttrick Hall 304 Mark Jarman

This class is a poetry workshop. Each week we will discuss poems you have written. Also, the week you have a poem under discussion, you will prepare to talk about a poem in one of our texts. This poem can be related in some way to your own or simply be an example of a kind of poem you would like to write. This will give everybody a chance to read a good deal of contemporary poetry. Good poets are good readers. Writing and reading in this class will, I hope, be of equal interest. Eight original poems, (four of which will be discussed in class), plus a revision of each poem; four oral reports. The eight revisions, typed copies of the four oral reports, and responses to the visiting poets will be due as a final project or portfolio as the end of the semester. The poems not discussed in class must be shown to me before the final project is due.

ONCE YOU HAVE SIGNED UP FOR THE CLASS, SEND PROFESSOR JARMAN THREE (3) EXAMPLES OF YOUR POETRY. YOU MAY EMAIL THEM TO mark.jarman@vanderbilt.edu

ENGL 208B Representative British Writers, 1660-1900: 

.01 MWF 910-1000 Calhoun Hall 320 Gottfried, Roy

No writer writes in a vacuum. Moved not only by the surrounding events of the time and place, a writer is changed as well by previous authors and works. This course will examine the major periods of English literature from the Restoration to the Modern era in their cultural features and will study the major poets in engagement with their literary predecessors. The course provides an exposure to the famous works of the English tradition for the general student and provides a broad background for those students considering more specialized advanced studies.

.02 MW 235-350 Stevenson Center 1210 Humberto Garcia

The Empire of English Literature: In “The Literature of Knowledge and the Literature of Power” (1848), the English writer Thomas De Quincey argues that a truly representative survey of British literature teaches “nothing at all.” Unlike the literature of knowledge, which merely teaches, the literature of power moves us emotionally to grasp universal, enduring truths—justice, the good, the cosmos—in its respective national language, even when the nation that birthed these great writers has passed away. This course will test De Quincey’s hypothesis, reflecting on the criterion we use when we elect to linger over some literary works and bypass others. We will examine the presuppositions governing this survey course: What is literature and what makes it “British”? Why some literary works are judged as better than others? How do British writers represent (or resist) the scale, complexity, and anonymity of modern life? In order to answer these questions, we will focus on various genres that reflect on the growth and expansion of England as an imperial nation worthy of its own literary tradition; a nation which, having colonized more than 85% of the world by the twentieth century, was known as the empire where the sun never set. Our journey begins in the late seventeenth century with Aphra Behn and John Dryden, continues with Alexander Pope, Daniel Defoe, and William Wordsworth, and ends in the late Victorian era with Emily Bronte and Rudyard Kipling.

ENGL 210:Shakespeare: Representative Selections

 .01 MW 845-1000 Calhoun Hall 218 King

Shakespeare's Afterlife:Without Shakespeare, much of the English language (not to mention Hollywood) would cease to exist. In particular, his dramatic texts continue to influence our entertainment in the form of adaptations. Yet when we encounter these adaptations, we must also consider the following: At what point does Shakespeare stop being Shakespeare? And, conversely, what is essentially Shakespeare? Is, for instance, Macbeth still Macbeth when the text is rewritten, renamed, and performed by prisoners and staff in Northern Ireland’s notorious Maghaberry Prison in the case of Mickey B? Finally, what might these revisions reveal about the original text (and our anxieties concerning it)?

Such questions will govern our classroom discussions as we read thirteen plays that represent Shakespeare’s comedies, tragedies, and histories as well as his “problem plays.” While we will explore these plays in relation to the historical-cultural context that gave rise to them, we will also take a decidedly “forward” look. That is to say, we will examine the ways in which Shakespeare’s texts reemerge in later centuries as cartoons, literature, and, of course, film.

Satisfies pre-1800 literature requirement for major

ENGL 211: Representative American Writers

.01 MWF 110-200 Calhoun Hall 203 Gabriel Briggs

This course will cover the rise of the novel in the United States from the end of the revolutionary period to the 1850s. We will read the work of authors who dominate American literary history, such as Charles Brockden Brown, James Fenimore Cooper, and Herman Melville, but we will also study additional writers who challenge conventional wisdom, and help us to imagine alternative literary histories in the U.S. In our reading, we will focus on two related questions: how does the novel capture the social and political pressures of a particular historical moment? Where is the line between fiction and history, dreams and reality? The novels we will examine cut across several literary genres, including the Sentimental Novel, the American Gothic, and the Historical Romance, and we will attempt both to understand and to theorize the relationship between literary and historical writing.

ENGL 213W:Literature of the American Civil War

01 MW 110-225 Calhoun Hall 117 Dicker

In this class, we will examine the literature of the American Civil War. The main goal of the course is to read a substantial selection of the most important and influential literature written about the war.  Our focus will be on longer fiction, but we will also discuss short stories, poems, and films. We will begin by using Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin as a way to understand the views about race and slavery that led to the union’s collapse. Although we will concentrate on texts produced around the time of the conflict (Miss Ravenel’s Conversion, Hospital Sketches, and The Gates Ajar), we will also read literature produced well after the war’s end (The Red Badge of Courage, The Unvanquished, and Jubilee). These texts will help us to make sense of the war, its origins, and its impact not just on those living during the nineteenth century but on those interested in its meaning in the present day.  Class sessions will alternate between lecture, discussion, and small-group activity.  Work for the class will include reading assignments, response papers, discussion leading, essays, and a final exam.

ENGL 221:Medieval Literature

.01 TR 110-225 Calhoun Hall 117 Plummer 

This course introduces the student to the chief literary forms and cultural issues of the late 13th through the 15th centuries in England. We learn Middle English while reading chronicles, saints= lives, drama, romance, lyrics, and allegory, exploring the alterity and modernity of medieval culture, what we have in common with the period and how we differ from it. No previous experience with medieval studies is required or expected. Graded work includes a midterm and final exam, and a paper of 8-10 pages.

Satisfies pre-1800 literature requirement for major

ENGL 230, "The Eighteenth-Century English Novel":

.01 TR 400-515 Calhoun Hall 104  Andrea Hearn

This course will introduce students not only to several major novelists of the long English eighteenth century in their significant social, cultural, and political contexts, but also to a number of readings in our discipline of the novel’s “rise” as a literary form and phenomenon. Texts are likely to include Defoe’s Moll Flanders, Richardson’s Pamela (or selections from Clarissa), Fielding’s Jonathan Wild, Sterne’s Sentimental Journey, Burney’s Evelina, and Austen’s Northanger Abbey.

Satisfies pre-1800 literature requirement for major

ENGL 232A:Twentieth-Century American Novel

 .01 TR 110-225 Calhoun Hall 337 Bell

ENGL 237W:World Literature, Modern

.01 TR 235-350 Buttrick 123 Julia Fesmire

This course familiarizes students with the global context of the Western tradition, as well as with the Western tradition in literature and culture, seventeenth century to the present.  Texts include:  Marlowe’s Dr. Faustus, Molière’s Don Juan, Pope’s The Rape of the Lock and other poems, Byron’s Don Juan, Pushkin’s Eugene Onegin, Flaubert’s Madame Bovary, Rostand’s Cyrano de Bergerac, Woolf’s  A Room of One’s Own, Bulgakov’s The Master and Margarita, McEwan’s Atonement, Stoppard’s Arcadia, Roy’s The God of Small Things.

ENGL 248: Sixteenth Century

.01 MW 235-350 Calhoun Hall 219 Lynn Enterline

Partly due to the power of his way of collecting the scattered tales of Greco-Roman mythology into “the semblance of a unified body,” and partly due to the Roman poet’s important place in the humanist educational platform, Ovid was one of the ancient poets whose work had the greatest impact on Renaissance art and literature.  Many of his stories – Orpheus’s voice, able to persuade even the god of death to relent; Narcissus’s deadly encounter with his mirror; Arachne’s tapestry of the gods’ violent intervention in the human world; the power of Medusa, able to turn men to stone; Pygmalion’s dream of a statue come to life – continue to surface in later periods and other forms of art as well. But this seminar aims to take the measure of Ovid’s literary impact by way of a broad survey of his presence in the poetry and drama of Elizabethan England.  “The loves of the gods” inhabit most of the period’s important literary forms – dramatic as well as lyric, narrative, allegorical, and epic poetry. We will follow the many ways that Ovid’s (often violent) representations of desire and bodily transformation play out in the Elizabethan literary imagination.  Authors range from the well known (Wyatt, Shakespeare, Marlowe, Donne, Spenser, Sidney) to the lesser known (Thomas Lodge, John Marston, Thomas Heywood, John Lyly) so that students become acquainted with a wide range of modes in 16th century writing.  Topics include: Elizabethan classicism and masculinity; education and the art of imitation; theatrical cross-dressing and poetic cross-voicing; authorship and desire; language and trauma; the vexed relationship between identity and embodiment.

Satisfies pre-1800 literature requirement for major

ENGL 252A: Restoration and the Eighteenth Century

.01 TR 235-350 TBA Scott Juengel

“Women Writers and Public Life in the Long Eighteenth Century” Spanning from Aphra Behn to Anne Brontë, this course considers the influence of women in the eighteenth-century literary and intellectual marketplace. The syllabus will survey of a range of genres, many of which were consolidating into their distinctly “modern” forms (e.g. the novel, satire, periodical essay, autobiography), but we will focus exclusively on the literary productions of women and the reformation of the public sphere. Many of the figures we attend to were either instrumental in crafting new literary forms or successfully expanded the expressive potential of existing genres through formal experimentation: similarly, a number of the works we will read are specifically concerned with thematizing the question of public life, while also revising the rules governing the private, or domestic, sphere. The eighteenth-century is the first great age of the female writer and our deliberations will begin with Aphra Behn, of whom Virginia Woolf in A Room of One’s Own wrote, “All women together ought to let flowers fall upon the tomb of Aphra Behn, for it was she who earned them the right to speak their minds.”

Texts likely chosen from among the following: Behn, The Rover and Love-Letters Between a Nobleman and His Sister; Haywood, Fantomina and selections from The Female Spectator; Montagu, Turkish Embassy Letters;Collier, selections from An Essay on the Art of Ingeniously Tormenting;Scott, A Description of Millenium Hall; Burney, Evelina; Wollstonecraft, Vindications of the Rights of Woman; Hays, Memoirs of Emma Courtney;Edgeworth, Belinda; Austen, Northanger Abbey or Emma; Prince, The History of Mary Prince;Brontë, The Tenant of Wildfell Hall and poetry by Finch, Barbauld, Smith, Robinson and others.

Satisfies pre-1800 literature requirement for major

ENGL 254A: The Romantic Period

.01 TR 1100-1215 Wilson Hall 113 Scott Juengel

“Jane Austen and the Age of Revolution” The Marxist critic Raymond Williams once famously wrote, “It is a truth universally acknowledged, that Jane Austen chose to ignore the decisive historical events of her time. Where, it is still asked, are the Napoleonic wars: the real current of history?” This course is designed to offer an antidote to this familiar portrait of Austen-the-miniaturist, the artist content to abstain from the larger world either out of modesty or indifference. The question of Austen’s worldliness will serve as a governing principle for a semester-long investigation into the relationship between the local and the global, the domestic and cosmopolitan, the individual and the world. But this is not explicitly a course on Jane Austen: rather, the syllabus will use a selection of Austen’s fictions as anchoring texts around which a motivated survey of romanticism and revolution will be organized. Specifically, Northanger Abbey will initiate a discussion of the politics of the imagination so central to revolutionary movements; Mansfield Park serves as an intervention into the moral economies of freedom, captivity, and human rights; and Persuasion will allow us to think about the interplay between individual and world-historical events. In addition to the three Austen novels, figures encountered are likely to include Wordsworth, Coleridge, Rousseau, Blake, Godwin, Wollstonecraft, Equiano, Kant, Barbauld, and the Shelleys.

ENGL 256:Modern British and American Poetry: Yeats to Auden

 .01 TR 935-1050 Buttrick Hall 305 Mark Jarman

This course will consider those modern poets, writing in English, primarily between 1900 and 1950, who left the strongest imprint on the poetry of their own time and subsequently:  W. B. Yeats, T. S. Eliot, Ezra Pound, William Carlos Williams, Marianne Moore, and Wallace Stevens.  In the first half of the 20th century, each of these poets created a unique style which embodied his or her personal vision of the poet and the modern world.  All but Yeats, who was Irish, were Americans. Yeats, despite living and working many years in London, was strongly attached to his childhood home in County Sligo, and played a critical role in the formation of modern Irish literature and culture. Eliot, born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri, and Pound, born in Idaho and raised in Pennsylvania, were expatriates, living in London in Eliot’s case, and in Pound’s case, in London, Paris, and Italy. Eliot became an English citizen and is claimed by both the U.S. and England. Williams lived and worked as a doctor in the place of his birth, Rutherford, New Jersey. Marianne Moore lived most of her life in New York City, working for a time at the New York Public Library. Wallace Stevens was an insurance executive in Hartford, Connecticut. We will consider these poets’ association with place, culture, society, and the history of their times. For all of them, the art of poetry was foremost. Class will consist of an ongoing discussion of their poems and, where relevant, their prose. Two papers, a final, homework assignments throughout the semester.

ENGL 259:

.06 MWF 110-200 Gillette Hall 103 Justin Quarry

Monsters in Fiction~In this course, we will explore portrayals of various monsters—both realistic and fantastic—in narratives ranging from the late nineteenth to the twenty-first centuries and analyze the elements of fiction used to illuminate them and in turn the societal anxieties and desires in the midst of which they appear. Likewise, we will attempt to define, and perhaps redefine, what, or who, exactly, a "monster" is and what makes a such a creature simultaneously horrifying and fascinating, and we will proceed to examine novels, graphic novels, and short stories in order to determine the terms by which so-called monsters are understood and described, and what beyond the norm these creatures represent, both literally and metaphorically, in each encounter.

Moreover, however, the aim of this course is to teach you to think critically about literature, and so we also will devote a significant amount of time to focusing on the writing process by way of close readings, discussions, and writing assignments. Throughout the semester, you will practice analyzing and critiquing our selected literary works in three essays as well as several reading responses and in-class writing assignments, each intended to help you more clearly and more persuasively present your arguments by basing them on textual evidence.

ENGL 115F: First Year Writing Seminar

.17 MWF 910-1000 Benson Hall 200 Baca

FYS: Fictions Possibilities-What makes fiction tick? What are the possibilities and boundaries of short stories? Flash fiction?

Novels? Where is the common ground between fiction and poetry, fiction and drama, fiction and film? What techniques are shared, borrowed, adapted? This course is designed with the interests of new and potential fiction writers in mind. An exploration of several different prose fiction forms and the approaches the techniques many contemporary writers use in creating them. How do different writers represent time? Consciousness? Perception? What kinds of architecture do these writers use?

Consideration of the tensions within fiction, the ways different writers portray character, the integration of lyricism and storytelling, as well as ways contemporary fiction writers claim received forms or re-invent them.

.31 MW 110-225 Stambaugh House 107 Covington

FYS:Existential Fictions: What nonsense. They read quickly, badly, and pass judgment before they have understood. So let's begin all over. This doesn't amuse anyone, neither you nor me. But we have to hit the nail on the head. Jean-Paul Sartre, What is Literature, 1947. Fiction, D.H. Lawrence suggests, is a laboratory for philosophical problems, and this course will enter the lab of existentialists. Sometimes called, with scorn or praise, a "psychology," existentialism has been a dominant post-World War II philosophy, because it directs its concerns not to a transcendental realm but to the world of human behavior, a world of guns, unrequited love, people reading too quickly. Sartre's continual effort to be understood (illustrated in the above quotation) characterizes both his method and what he saw as the human condition. For him, people are free - or condemned - to choose. But what does choice mean, if the consequences cannot be reckoned? To choose as an individual or an institution? Finally, why choose to be human? We will take on such questions in the fictions of existentialists (Sartre, Beauvoir, Camus) and in the existential ideas of other contemporary works (Murdoch, Atwood, Madonna, Oe, Elvis Costello). We will try to hit the nail on the head - if we can identify it and find a hammer.

.37 MWF 1110-1200 Murray House 206 Morrell

FYS:Virtual Worlds: Virtual Worlds, Augmented Realities. This course will examine fictional and nonfictional representations of cyberspace, challenging students to think critically about the role of social media in contemporary culture. We will consider how digital technologies intersect with everyday habits and with world historical events. Through an examination of literature and film, ranging from William Gibson¿s Neuromancer to the Wachowski brothers¿ The Matrix, we will discuss issues of privacy and intellectual property. We will also explore other intriguing issues, such as the agents who control our perception of reality and the motivations for constructing alternate worlds.

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