Society Of Biology Essay Competition

The Book Awards ran from 2013-2016 and celebrated outstanding biology books for the general reader, as well as exceptional undergraduate and postgraduate textbooks.

 

There were three categories:

General Biology Book Prize

A prize of £500 for an accessible, engaging and informative life sciences book written for a non-specialist audience.

Undergraduate Textbook Prize

A prize of £500 for an outstanding life sciences textbook for undergraduates. Cost, readability and accuracy of information for students will be the most important considerations.

Postgraduate Textbook Prize

A prize of £500 for an outstanding life sciences textbook for postgraduates. Cost, readability and accuracy of information for students will be the most important considerations.

Winners in 2016

                       

Congratulations to the 2016 winners who were celebrated at the Biology Week Annual Awards Ceremony. Find out which other superb titles made the shortlist.

Judges in 2016

 

General Biology Book Prize

 

Victoria Gill

Vic is a producer/reporter for the BBC website, writing feature stories - primarily about science and ethics. Vic followed a neuroscience degree from the University of Edinburgh with a science communication masters from the University of West of England.

Dr William Marshall CBiol FRSB

William was clinical director of pathology and consultant clinical biochemist at The London Clinic, a leading London independent hospital. He is author of the standard UK undergraduate and postgraduate textbooks in clinical biochemistry and has contributed to and edited several books for the Association for Clinical Biochemistry.

Dr Rebecca Nesbit MRSB

Following a biology degree from Durham University, Rebecca studied butterfly migration at Rothamsted Research. Since her PhD she has had varied roles in science communication, and she currently works with the Nobel Prize Inspiration Initiative. Her first novel, A Column of Smoke, was published in 2014.

Undergraduate Textbook Prize category:


Dr Clare Miller

Clare is a senior lecturer in microbiology at the University of Lincoln where her research involves utilising a range of biophysical techniques to study interactions between antimicrobial agents and bacterial cells. She is also interested in the dissemination of microbiological information through traditional and social media. Before working in higher education she was a teacher and continues to work as a senior GCSE science examiner.

Professor Jenny Morton FRSB

Jenny is professor of neurobiology at the University of Cambridge. She is based in the Department of Physiology, Development and Neuroscience where she works on Huntington's disease using mouse and sheep models. She is particularly interested in sleep and circadian disorder, as well as cognitive decline in neurodegenerative diseases. She is director of studies in medicine and veterinary medicine at Newnham College, Cambridge, where she also teaches pharmacology to undergraduates

Dr David Slingsby CBiol FRSB

David was chair of education for the British Ecological Society for 9 years and recently stepped down as editor of the Journal of Biological Education. He is a senior biology A level examiner, and a tutor with the OU on three modules (evolution, ecosystems and human biology). He has over 30 years' experience as a biology teacher.

Postgraduate Textbook Prize category:


Ian Carter CBiol MRSB

Ian followed a zoology degree from Durham University with several years' research experience in Brunei and Sarawak looking at rainforests, and then a PGCE at Cambridge University. He is a Fellow of the Galton Institute, which is involved in human genetics research, a major current interest. He has been chief examiner for S level, principal examiner for A level, a question setter for AEA papers and chief examiner for the Government KS3 Science papers. He continues to contribute articles to The Biologist and the Journal of Biological Education and is currently associate editor of the School Science Review.

Dr Sue Howarth CBiol FRSB

Sue is a senior lecturer in secondary science education at the University of Worcester and a Fellow of the Royal Society of Biology. Before working in higher education she was a teacher and won the Society's Teacher of the Year Award. She has been on the Publications Committee of the Association for Science Education, and the Editorial Board of The Biologist for several years and is currently an editorial associate for School Science Review.

Dr Ian Turner MRSB

Ian is a senior lecturer and deputy head of the Department of Natural Sciences at the University of Derby. Ian is National Teaching Fellow and passionate about, innovative teaching and assessment in higher education. Ian has a range of research and professional interests from science communication, gamification to pedagogy.


Our 2015 winners were celebrated at the Biology Week Annual Awards Ceremony

 

Our 2014 winners received their prize at a London Annual Awards Ceremony

 

Congratulations to our inaugural winners in 2013

 

SRF Stewart Rhind Science Writing Prize

05.02.18– We are now inviting submissions for the 2018 prize. Please note, that from 2018, there are no longer two parallel competitions for undergraduate and postgraduate entries. All entries will be judged together for one prize.

SUBMISSION DEADLINE: FRIDAY 6 JULY 2018, 17.30 HRS (UK TIME).

2017 SRF Steward Rhind Science Writing Prize

We were delighted to award the 2017 SRF Stewart Rhind Science Writing Prize to Kirsty Uttley, a fourth year student at the University of Edinburgh studying Biological Sciences (Molecular Genetics) (BSc Hons). Kirsty won the prize for her essay ‘The Current State of Mitochondrial  Replacement Therapy’.

Read Kirsty’s essay here.

Kirsty was presented with her certificate and £500 prize money at Fertility 2018 in January by Dr Adam Watkins.

There was no postgraduate prize awarded in 2017.

Who was Stewart Rhind?

The SRF Essay Prize was renamed in honour of Dr Stewart Rhind who was tragically killed in a car accident in March 2013, along with his colleague Dr Julian Dawson. Click here to read  more about Dr Rhind and why Professor Mick Rae, a friend and colleague of Dr Rhind, feels that renaming the essay competition was a suitable way for the Society to remember Stewart and his contributions.

Competition Guidelines
  • The essay must be about an aspect of reproductive biology and will be assessed on scientific content, style and topicality.
  • The essay should be written in a style accessible to the educated non-specialist reader (similar to a New Scientist or Scientific American article – see previous winning essays below for examples).  Course essays written in a standard scientific style are unlikely to be successful in the competition.
  • NEW! From 2018, there are no longer two parallel competitions for undergraduate and postgraduate entries. All entries will be judged together for one prize.
  • The winner will receive a prize of £500, one year’s free membership of the SRF and will be invited to attend the Fertility meeting (January 2019) to receive their prize. The winning entry will be published on the SRF website.

VIEW PREVIOUS WINNING ESSAYS

Eligibility
  1. Entrants must be attending a university in the UK or Ireland to be eligible to enter.
  2. Essays from graduate entry medical and veterinary students are welcome.
  3. Previous winners of the essay prize are not eligible to re-enter the competition.
Submission Guidelines
  1. The essay should be no more than 2000 words in length (including references).
  2. Entries must include a cover page detailing the following information:
    – Author’s name
    – Author’s address, contact telephone number and email address
    – Degree title, year of study and institution
  3. Entries should be written in a style accessible to the educated non-specialist reader.
  4. Entrants must ensure that all figures comply with UK copyright regulations.
  5. Essays must be submitted by email (as MS Word documents) to the SRF Secretariat at srf@conferencecollective.co.uk
  6. SRF reserves the right to scan submissions electronically to detect plagiarism.
  7. SRF reserves the right to withhold the prize in the event that no entry is deemed to be of a sufficiently high standard.
  8. By submitting an essay, the author agrees to transfer copyright to the SRF and to allow the Society to disseminate the essay in electronic and print media.

The Stewart Rhind Science Writing Prize 2016 was awarded to Ms Lina Zakarauskaite (3rd year, BSc Hons in Biomedical Sciences, University of Edinburgh) for her essay entitled ‘The evolution of sex chromosomes and dosage compensation in mammals’.

Lina accepting her prize from Dr Andrew Childs

A copy of the winning essay will be uploaded shortly.

No postgraduate prize was awarded in 2016.

 

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