Dos And Donts When Attending A Job Interview Essay Writing

Essay writing is an obligatory academic assignment, regardless of course of study and institution.

However, few students find the essay writing process easy. Of course, practice makes perfect and by the time students hit their senior year in college, most of them can write an essay in their sleep.

However, no one wants to learn from their own mistakes so knowing the most important dos and don'ts of essay writing will help make this experience less stressful and more productive.

There is no universal template that can solve every college essay trouble.

However, the following rules of writing are standard and applicable to all types of academic essay, no matter what the course and topic:

The Do's of Essay Writing

Do Make your Essay Easy to Read

Because of the large number of essays that have to be graded, many instructors admit that they skim read essays to get an idea if a student is competent in the topic and how well they have adhered to the style guidelines. Therefore, it is a good idea to structure your essay so the key points are visible when skim reading and are clear enough to get the message across.

Get rid of extra words and phrases, use clear constructions and stick to the point.


Do Include a Thesis Statement in the Introduction

A thesis statement is an important part of introduction and the essay in general, so it should never be neglected. The thesis statement should reveal the main idea of the essay in a concise format.

Although it is an obligatory part of the introduction, never make your thesis statement the opening sentence of your essay. It is a good idea to place it at the end of the introductory paragraph so it serves as a transition to the main body of the essay.


Do Use Transitions Between Paragraphs

Sometimes paragraphs sound like separate pieces of text put together. This is the wrong approach to writing.

Your essay should be smooth and coherent, leading the reader from one point to another. This is why you should use transitions – the phrases that help to connect each idea with the previous one, serving like bridges between paragraphs.

Examples of phrases you can use for transitions include:

  • Despite the previous arguments…
  • Speaking about this…
  • Regarding this…
  • With regards to this…
  • As has been noted…
  • To put it briefly…

Do Cite Examples

Any example you use – from literature, scientific work, etc. - should be cited.

Only examples from your own experience do not have to be cited. If you want to include mention of something that you have read, even if you are not using a direct quotation,  it is best to reference the source of the information. This way, your examples will be more convincing and form more reliable evidence of the points you wish to prove.


Do Discuss Literature in the Present Tense

When writing literary reviews or essays based on literary works it is advisable to use present tense – historical present or narrative present, as it is called. It makes the storytelling more engaging and real, increasing the feeling of presence.

For example:

‘Romeo and Juliet experience true love the moment they see each other. Love makes them forget everything else. From the very beginning they are somehow aware that they are doomed to die – they have given up their lives to love. Not only love, but every emotion in the play is heightened and leads to terrible consequences.’

Book Reviewed by Amrita Dutta, Source: http://www.book-review-circle.com/Romeo-And-Juliet-William-Shakespeare.html


Do Use Advanced Vocabulary

The aim of an essay is to not only to reveal your knowledge of the topic, but to show your ability to choose appropriate vocabulary and show your language expertise.

You should show that your vocabulary has progressed since high school. That means using advanced vocabulary and replacing ‘good’ and ‘nice’ with more appropriate synonyms to reflect the shades of meaning.


Do Respond to the Prompt of the Essay

The prompt of the essay is intentional.

No matter how much you want to ‘go with the flow’ and write whatever your inspiration dictates, you should remember you are writing an academic assignment and, as long as it has a prompt, you should stick to it.

If the prompt is complicated and consists of several parts, analyze your final draft and check if you covered every point of the essay prompt.


Do Use Simple Sentences

Complicated sentences may be confusing, not only for the person reading and grading your essay but for the students themselves.

Writing complicated sentences doesn’t indicate elaborate writing style. Rather it may show your inability to convey information in a simple and readable format, or to break the sentences in a logical way. What’s more, complicated sentences increase the risk of grammar errors and stylistic mistakes. Famous writers, like Hemingway or Fitzgerald, wrote simply and that didn’t make their writing any worse.


Do Choose Proper Type, Style and Format

A good essay is not about style and formatting, of course, but style influences the first impression your paper makes.

First and foremost, professors want to see the correct essay style and structure depending on the topic and essay type students have to tackle. In many cases, the style meant to be used in the essay is laid out in the directions or has been established beforehand. You may easily figure out the style based on the type of essay.


Do Choose the Right Language

The language you use in the paper indicates your ability to research and analyze the topic, prove your opinion, and explain your points clearly and vividly.

It also shows the level of your language proficiency, knowledge of grammar and syntax, and ability to develop rich vocabulary. It is important to remember the academic style of writing and use the appropriate language. The following phrases work well to introduce and support your points:

  • There seems to be no compelling reason to argue that …
  • The argument can be made …
  • Current research on [your topic] shows …
  • The most common argument in favor of (or against) is …
  • There is a growing body of evidence to support …

Do Revise your Writing Thoroughly

Before you hit ‘Save’ and print the final version, check your essay thoroughly to avoid spelling mistakes, typos and incorrect sentence constructions. Apart from language mistakes, check if you followed all the requirements: number of words/pages, text formatting, essay structure, etc.

See our page: Assignment Finishing Touches for more information.

The Don'ts of Essay Writing

Now that you’ve learnt the major Dos, let’s move to some Don’ts – the things you’d better avoid in essay writing.

Don't Overwhelm your Essay with Information and Facts

Though essays should be meaningful and detailed, learn to filter the information and choose only important points.

There is a temptation to include every single detail of your research to make the essay holistic and complete. However, your aim is to narrow the topic, show that you are able to analyze and structure information, and choose only the most relevant facts to prove your points.


Don't Neglect Formatting Details

No matter what your style and formatting requirements are, you should not forget to pay attention to the following points: paper size, spaces, font size, margins, and page numbers.

Also do not forget about narration types. For example, narrative essays tell stories from first person while persuasive or argumentative essays require that you leave emotions out and base your views on the solid facts, so no first person narration is appropriate.


Don't Use Too Many Clichés

While using set phrases, avoid overwhelming your essay with clichés.

Remember that not all clichés are good for every type of essay. What's more, professors expect your work to be original and truly value students with fresh ideas and views. Also, beware of using informal language. This doesn't mean that your writing should be reminiscent of a scientific thesaurus rather than real speech, but academic writing requires a certain level of formality.

See our page: Avoiding Clichés for more.

Don't Let Typos Ruin your Essay

Although typos do not indicate your language proficiency or grammar knowledge, they may show your professor that you are not attentive enough or do not care enough to proof read your essay.

Submitting a paper that looks like a draft can be interpreted by a professor as disrespectful.


Don’t Rely Only on Spell Checkers

Though spell checkers are good way to automatically proof read your writing, don’t rely on software alone.

These programs may miss a lot of spelling errors that that human eye will definitely notice. So, take time to proof read your essay. It is better to print out the final version on paper as spelling mistakes can be missed when reading from the screen. It is a good idea to ask someone else to have a fresh look at your essay and to proofread it for spelling mistakes.


Do Not Plagiarize

This rule should be clear for every student.

Plagiarism is a form of cheating, and when detected it is always punished.

Do not risk your reputation and your place in higher education. Plagiarism is easily detected today with the help of software and Google, so be honest with yourself and your educators and write on your own.

Reference every source to make sure you are not committing plagiarism, even unintentionally. It is a good idea to ‘know your enemy’ and read about the kinds of plagiarism possible and best ways to avoid it.

See our page: Academic Referencing for more information.

Do Not Address the Reader

No matter what type of essay you are writing, academic writing rarely reveals the author nor engages in the conversation with the reader. Addressing the reader is more a mark of fiction than an academic essay. While writing a college essay you should be detached, objective and analytical rather than appeal to the reader’s emotions and personality.


Don’t Start an Essay with “in this/my essay” Phrase

The introduction has to present the main idea of the essay and reveal what you are going to talk about.

Writing an effective introduction and including a thesis statement is enough to lead the reader into the context of your essay topic without using this meaningless high school phrase ‘In my essay I’m going to focus on…’


Don’t Use Negative Language

Negative language doesn’t mean vulgarisms. It means words with negative suffixes, phrases with negation, etc.

For example, painless is not a negative word in its meaning. However, using it makes the reader focus on pain instead of its absence. So it is better to replace so called negative language with more positive, synonymous expressions, like using economical instead of inexpensive, or comfortable/pleasant instead of painless.


When writing an essay you should walk a fine line between presenting a clear idea of the established knowledge and proving that you understand it well enough to make an independent assessment.

Show your professor your ability to format an essay correctly, choose the right style, express your point of view and prove it with facts. Learn to balance the form and meaning and essays will no longer be challenging for you.

About the Author


Tracy Collins is a writing instructor, education enthusiast and the author of the academic essay writing site EssayUniverse.org.

You can find her on Google+ and Facebook

Job Interview Do's and Don'ts

What to Do (and Not to Do) and Say During an Interview

To succeed in a job interview it's important to say and do the right things that make a positive first impression and convince employers you would be a good fit for their company. It's also important to avoid making major mistakes that could raise questions about your professionalism or competence and cost you a chance at getting hired.

Here are some do's and don'ts to help you optimize your chances for success at a job interview:

Do: Prepare

Analyze the job requirements and the employer and be prepared to share compelling reasons why you would be a good fit. Prepare and rehearse what you plan to say, including answers to common interview questions such as the dreaded inquiry about your weaknesses. Carefully review your resume and be prepared to discuss challenges and successes in each position listed in the document. 

Do: Make a Good First Impression

Dress the part of someone successful in your chosen field. Make sure your clothing is appropriate for the work environment, fits well, and is neatly pressed. Greet your interviewer with a firm—but not bone-crunching—handshake and a warm smile. Sit up straight and lean slightly forward during the interview. Make regular—but not piercing or staring—eye contact. Show energy and enthusiasm through your vocal tone and listen carefully to each question before jumping in with a response.

When the interview is over, thank the interviewers for the opportunity and reiterate your interest in the position. Follow up with a letter, card, or email to each interviewer, expressing the same thanks and interest.

Do: Sell Yourself

Describe specific situations or challenges you have faced, the actions you took to intervene, and the results you generated.

Pay particular attention to how you have positively impacted the bottom line for past employers. Examples may include saving money, increasing sales, retaining staff, recruiting employees, securing funding, or improving quality.

Do: Ask Questions

Remember that you are interviewing the employer as much as the employer is interviewing you. Focus on questions about specific expectations and goals, both short-term and long-term for the company and for the position in question. Good questions help you to discover if the employer is a good fit for you, and they show the employer that you've done your homework and have a sincere interest in the company.

Don't: Be Negative

Never criticize any previous employers, supervisors, or co-workers during a job interview. This can raise questions about your ability to work well with others or to accept accountability. As well, don't fixate on your own weaknesses or treat them as hindrances. Be prepared to acknowledge them, but address them as an opportunity to learn and improve.

Don't: Fudge the Truth

Avoid the temptation to exaggerate when addressing your skills and accomplishments. It's important to put a positive spin on what you've done and what you can do, but it all needs to be truthful.

Being caught in even the smallest of white lies can raise questions about your character and fitness for the position in question.

Don't: Be Late (or Excessively Early)

Be on time for your interview, and remember to take into account that you'll likely want a few minutes to situate yourself, organize your notes, and maybe use the restroom. You should leave early enough to arrive at the interview no more than five to 10 minutes before it starts, but don't be earlier than this. Arriving too far in advance of the scheduled time can leave a negative impression and possibly raise questions about your time management skills or ability to follow directions.

Don't: Forget to Use Common Sense

Dressing or behaving too casually can raise questions about your professionalism, as can things like checking your cell phone during the interview.

If the interview involves a meal, never order an alcoholic beverage or select an entree that is difficult to eat gracefully. In general, follow your gut. If something seems like it would be inappropriate for a job interview, it probably is.

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